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2012 HURRICANE WATCH

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue Oct 23, 2012 2:29 pm  Reply with quote  

Tropical Storm "Sandy" is now moving north through the Caribbean and is presently projected to impact Cuba on Navy track maps. However; weather experts report the storm may reach Hurricane status before reaching and passing over "Jamaica" before moving on into Cuba...



http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?




http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=conus&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash



http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic

quote:

Tropical Storm Sandy South of Jamaica; Tropical Depression 19 in the mid-Atlantic

Oct 23, 2012 6:44 AM

Tropical Storm Sandy has 45-mph winds currently and is slowly strengthening. With the warm water and relatively lower shear Sandy will intensify into a hurricane by the time it reaches Jamaica on Wednesday.

Computer model consensus suggests Sandy will move north over Jamaica on Wednesday and move over eastern Cuba on Wednesday night and Thursday. We expect the storm to head into the Bahamas by Thursday night and Friday. Once the storm starts to interact with land it will stop intensifying. So, as it moves away from Jamaica and through eastern Cuba, past Haiti it will probably be a tropical storm. Once it moves into the relatively flat Bahamas it could attempt to intensify further. Computer models generally have it tracking north-northeast and staying just east of Florida and east of the Carolinas this weekend.

Torrential rainfall and strong to perhaps damaging winds will affect Jamaica, eastern Cuba and western Haiti during the next few days. This heavy rainfall could bring flash flooding and dangerous mudslides, especially in higher terrain areas of these islands. Potentially dangerous winds, rain and surge will affect the Bahamas by Friday into Saturday. A large pressure gradient between Sandy and high pressure to the north will bring gusty winds and rough surf to Florida coast.

The longer range outlook for Sandy is very complex. A large high pressure area to the north of the storm is not expected to move much into early next week. The high will either split, allowing the storm to track north-northeast or the high will move southwest causing Sandy to track closer to the mid-Atlantic coast. A very reliable computer model from Europe takes Sandy on a course much closer to the southeastern U.S. coast, then inland over the mid-Atlantic next week.

Another issue with Sandy will be classification. The storm will move northward into cooler air causing the storm to eventually transition to a non-tropical storm system. But the timing of this transition is going to be very difficult to figure. Regardless of classification, this storm could bring torrential rainfall and strong damaging winds to parts of the East Coast next week if it tracks close to the coast. If it stays well offshore as suggested by other computer forecasts then the only big impact will be rough surf. Since there is a large amount of uncertainty in the movement and strength of this storm for Sunday and next week, people along the east coast of the United States from Florida on north should pay close attention to the future movement of this storm system.

Another area of disturbed weather around 700 miles east-northeast of the Leeward Islands has become Tropical Depression 19. This newly formed tropical cyclone is moving north and should start to move north-northeast as an upper-level trough approaches from the west. This upper-level trough will help steer the system on a northeast path. The combination of warm water and light shear should allow the depression to become stronger and the system could intensify into Tropical Storm Tony today. The tropical cyclone will remain over open waters of the central Atlantic and will not affect any land mass for the next several days.

By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski and Senior Meteorologist Frank Strait and Meteorologist DJ Hoffman

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed Oct 24, 2012 2:30 pm  Reply with quote  

Not quite yet a Hurricane, "Sandy" is still forecast to reach that classification before crossing over Jamaica then on to Cuba, and possibly the East Coast of the US. Computer models aren't unanimous about the exact trajectory at this point.
Another system has also been named in the mid Atlantic, now Tropical Storm "Tony" appears to be headed toward the Azores presently on Navy track maps...


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=conus&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash






http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?




http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=sa&channel=vis&coverage=fd&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash



http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic

quote:

Sandy Strengthening and now Tropical Storm Tony
Oct 24, 2012 5:53 AM
Tropical Storm Sandy has 70-mph winds currently and it is strengthening. With the warm water and relatively lower shear, Sandy will intensify into a hurricane by the time it reaches Jamaica today. Sandy will move north over Jamaica today and move over eastern Cuba tonight and tomorrow. We expect the storm to head into the Bahamas by tomorrow night and Friday. Once the storm starts to interact with land, it will stop intensifying. So as it moves away from Jamaica and through eastern Cuba, past Haiti, it will probably be a tropical storm. Once it moves into the relatively flat Bahamas, it could attempt to intensify further. Computer models generally have it tracking north-northeast and staying just east of Florida and east of the Carolinas this weekend. Torrential rainfall and strong to perhaps damaging winds will affect Jamaica, eastern Cuba and western Haiti during the next few days. This heavy rainfall could bring flash flooding and dangerous mudslides, especially in higher terrain areas of these islands. Potentially dangerous winds, rain and surge will affect the Bahamas by Friday into Saturday. A large pressure gradient between Sandy and high pressure to the north will bring gusty winds and rough surf to Florida The longer-range outlook for Sandy is very complex. A large high pressure area north of the storm is not expected to move much into early next week. The high will either split, allowing the storm to track north-northeast or the high will move southwest causing Sandy to track closer to the mid-Atlantic coast. A very reliable computer model from Europe takes Sandy on a course closer to the Southeast and mid-Atlantic coast, then inland over southwestern New England next week. Another issue with Sandy will be classification. The storm will move northward into cooler air causing the storm to transition to a non-tropical storm system eventually. However, the timing of this transition is going to be very difficult to figure. Regardless of classification, this storm could bring torrential rainfall and strong damaging winds to parts of the East Coast next week if it tracks close to the coast. If it stays well offshore as suggested by other computer forecasts, then the only big impact will be rough surf. Since there is a large amount of uncertainty in the movement and strength of this storm for Sunday and next week, people along the east coast of the United States from Florida on north should pay close attention to the future movement of this storm system. Farther east we now have Tropical Storm Tony about 1,400 miles west-southwest of the Azores. This tropical cyclone is moving northeastward, and this general movement will continue for the next few days. The combination of warm water and light shear should allow Tony to strengthen a little more through Wednesday. The tropical cyclone will remain over open waters of the central Atlantic and will not affect any land mass for the next several days. By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologists Bob Smerbeck and Dan Kottlowski and Meteorologist DJ Hoffman

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Oct 25, 2012 2:28 pm  Reply with quote  

"Sandy" has achieved Hurricane status and is presently being clocked at a CAT 2 classification as it passes over Cuba and now heads for the Bahamas...
This storm is expected to roll up the eastern seaboard, but expert reports are as yet uncertain of its final outcome with respect to making landfall on US shores... Navy track maps have been updated over the last day and now reflect a slight shift toward the northern US East Coast. Whether or not this system makes landfall, it is going to produce extreme storm surges along the coast as it combines with the natural flow of the lunar tide cycle's full moon...
"Tony" remains well out in the open Atlantic and presently is no threat to land areas.


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=conus&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash


http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic

quote:


Hurricane Sandy Makes Landfall as Category 2 Hurricane; Tropical Storm Tony Churning Farther East

Oct 25, 2012 2:39 AM

Sandy has strengthened quickly to a Category 2 hurricane. Sandy made landfall on the southeastern coast of Cuba at 1:30 am EDT. Winds were 110 mph when Sandy made landfall with wind gust of 120 mph. Sandy will continue to move across Cuba causing damaging winds and flooding rain. Storm surge flooding will occur along the south coast of eastern Cuba overnight. The strongest winds and heaviest rainfall will shift away from Jamaica toward dawn. Rainfall through Thursday will average 6-12 inches with some higher amounts over Jamaica and Hispaniola. Life-threatening flash flooding and mudslides are risks. On its current path, Sandy will pass over the central Bahamas Thursday night and the northern Bahamas early Friday probably bringing hurricane conditions to those islands. Tropical storm conditions will occur along the southeast and east coast of Florida later Thursday night into Friday night. Later in the weekend and early next week, Sandy will likely feel the effects of an approaching upper-level trough digging into the eastern U.S. and be pulled more to the north and even northwest toward the mid-Atlantic or Northeast coast. High surf and waves along its path all the way from Florida to eventually New England are likely. Exactly how close and if the center of this storm comes onshore across somewhere from Maine to the Delmarva peninsula region will obviously impact the magnitude of the flooding and surf risks. Also in play is a full moon on Monday that will cause astronomically high tides that may enhance coastal flooding. Some of the latest computer models have trended westward with the track of Sandy later in the weekend into early next week as they eventually try to hook it back to the northwest early next week. The computer models continue to have a wide range of potential tracks early next week anywhere from the Delmarva Peninsula to Maine. A direct path to the mid-Atlantic or Northeast coast would cause widespread flooding from heavy rain and storm surge, as well as damaging winds and power outages along and to the north of the track of Sandy. Also tree snapping heavy wet snow may occur farther inland. All people from the central and northern Appalachians to the eastern coast of the United States should continue to to monitor the track of Sandy, especially this weekend and early next week. Regardless of exact track, rough and dangerous surf will be expanding northward from the east coast of Florida Friday into the next week. Farther east, we now have Tropical Storm Tony about 900 miles west-southwest of the Azores. This tropical cyclone is moving east-northeastward and will remain over open waters of the central Atlantic and will not affect any land mass for the next several days. By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Bob Smerbeck and Updated by Meteorologist DJ Hoffman






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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Oct 26, 2012 2:28 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Sandy" is still holding a CAT 1 classification & is now reported to be a killer storm, taking lives in Cuba, Jamaica, & Haiti as it moved through the Caribbean. The storm is now expected to make landfall along the eastern US, and may combine with another storm system to create what some are calling "the perfect storm" or "super storm" for the East Coast...

http://news.msn.com/us/death-toll-hits-22-as-sandy-heads-for-us

quote:

Hurricane Sandy raged through the Bahamas early Friday after leaving 22 people dead across the Caribbean, following a path that could see it blend with a winter storm to hit the U.S. East Coast with a super-storm next week.


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=conus&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash





http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic

quote:


Hurricane Sandy Battering the Bahamas, Still Set to Savage the Eastern U.S.

Oct 26, 2012 6:40 AM

Hurricane Sandy weakened a bit overnight as the system crossed through the Bahamas, but the storm is still expected to maintain hurricane strength as it continues on a generally northward path today. A gradual turn to the northeast is expected this evening into Saturday morning, keeping Sandy offshore as we head into the weekend. Rain will gradually taper to showers across Florida and the Bahamas with winds subsiding across the island nation, and neither flooding rain nor damaging winds are expected to be a major issue in the short term. Rip currents and rough surf will be evident, however, along the Southeast coast today and over the weekend. Model guidance continues to suggest that an approaching storm system over the mid-Atlantic will "capture" Sandy and pull the storm back to the west early next week. While we cannot say for certain where Sandy will make landfall, it seems more likely than not that Sandy will deliver a strong blow to at least portions of the region. Our current forecast has Sandy approaching the Jersey Shore late Monday night into Tuesday morning and pushing inland from there. In all cases, and especially this particular case, one should not focus on the exact landfall point as strong winds, heavy rainfall and coastal flooding will extend a considerable distance from the storm's center. An intriguing side of this storm isn't tropical in nature at all pulled into the storm to change rain to heavy, wet snow in at least the higher terrain of West Virginia, western Virginia and even the mountains of northwestern North Carolina. Again, it's too early to focus on specifics, but a crippling snow event measured in feet is not out of the question for parts of West Virginia if the track is just right. Stay tuned! By AccuWeather.com meteorologist Randy Adkins.






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visual ray wizard





Joined: 09 Jul 2005
Posts: 461
Location: United States
Hi starman PostFri Oct 26, 2012 10:30 pm  Reply with quote  

I watched the initial cold front pass thru Kentucky today and from personal observations and apparent sunshine that occured off and on today this particular cold front will not have the projected steering effects that had been forecasted by computer models so it very possible that the storm will now track a bit more to the west than was previously forecasted.

Hope that helps and it does seem that this storm has the potential for going down in the history books as another "perfect storm".
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visual ray wizard





Joined: 09 Jul 2005
Posts: 461
Location: United States
Thanks you have the best weather links PostFri Oct 26, 2012 10:47 pm  Reply with quote  

Would pay a monthly fee to have the unfiltered product but then again what you see in the sky and what you see on your computer are some what smeared or smoothed out! lol
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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Oct 27, 2012 2:25 pm  Reply with quote  

Now a mainstream event, Hurricane "Sandy" is forecast to impact some time during Monday night or Tuesday morning along the shore's near New Jersey... The system is combining with an inland storm and the two events seen on satellite imagery now cover nearly the entire East Coast region...
Many of the regions states have declared "a state of emergency" and are warning residence to prepare for power outages, coastal flooding, excessive winds and rains & even snow events, etc. all associated with this system...



http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?


http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=conus&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash


http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/atlantic

quote:


Hurricane Sandy Battering the Eastern Carolinas Today, Targeting the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast by Monday

Oct 27, 2012 9:26 AM

Sandy is continuing to track off to the north-northeast and Hurricane Hunter Aircraft on Saturday morning found winds strong enough to bring Sandy back to hurricane status. Strong winds across the northern Bahamas today will diminish as Sandy moves away from the area and passes east of Florida and the Carolinas later today into tonight and tomorrow.

Strong gusty winds and heavy rain will batter the eastern Carolinas today into tonight and tomorrow, bringing wind gusts in excess of 60 mph to portions of the Outer Banks of North Carolina around Cape Hatteras. In addition to the rain and wind, there will be coastal flooding, power outages and some coastal roads could experience washouts. Wind and rain will then diminish on Sunday night and Monday morning across eastern North Carolina as Sandy pulls away to the north.

Sandy will then take a turn back to the west and make landfall late on Monday or perhaps very early on Tuesday morning in the mid-Atlantic, likely in southern New Jersey. However, by this time the storm will be large and spread out, so the exact track of the center will not matter much in terms of impacts as heavy rain and damaging winds will affect a wide area across the mid-Atlantic and Northeast regardless of the exact landfall point.

Damaging wind gusts Monday through Tuesday as high as 60-80 mph will affect areas from Virginia to southern New England, causing widespread power outages and downed trees. In addition, there will be coastal flooding due to a 5- to 10-foot storm surge along the coast along and to the north and northeast of the center of circulation of Sandy and waves offshore can be as high as 30-40 feet. A widespread area of 4-8 inches of heavy rain will also batter much of the mid-Atlantic leading to flooding of creeks, streams and small rivers that will rise quickly due to all the rainfall.

The center of Sandy will begin to weaken and spin itself down by Wednesday and Thursday of next week, but it will remain breezy and chilly with bouts of showers across much of the Northeast and mid-Atlantic through this time.

Elsewhere across the Atlantic Basin, we are not anticipating any tropical development in the next 24 to 48 hours.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski





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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Nov 01, 2012 2:44 pm  Reply with quote  

May those lost in what was Hurricane "Sandy" never be forgotten... And those still suffering from it's effects be comforted in this time of need...



Now, out in the East Pacific waters is Tropical Storm "Rosa".
This storm is presently forecast to remain out at sea away from any land areas...

http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?



http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=west&channel=vis&coverage=nh&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash




http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/east-pacific

quote:

Tropical Storm Rosa Maintains Strength

Nov 1, 2012 7:35 AM

Tropical Storm Rosa has maintained strength early Thursday morning with sustained winds of 60 mph but poses no threat to land. Rosa will move very slowly the next couple of days, probably southwest into Friday, then turn northwest over the weekend. The storm poses no threat to any land mass. The storm will remain a tropical storm through Friday, perhaps weakening slightly. Starting Saturday, it will encounter much higher wind shear. The increasing wind shear should bring Rosa's demise over the weekend.

A cluster of thunderstorms is also being monitored approximately 120 miles east of Rosa. This area remains unorganized and strong wind shear over the next couple of days will limit development.

Elsewhere, there are no major concerns for development in the remainder of the basin.

By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer






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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
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PostFri Nov 02, 2012 2:13 pm  Reply with quote  

No significant changes with respect to "Rosa" in the East Pacific...


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?



http://www.accuweather.com/en/hurricane/east-pacific

quote:

Tropical Storm Rosa Slowly Weakening

Nov 1, 2012 5:43 PM

Tropical Storm Rosa continued to weaken late Thursday over the eastern Pacific. Rosa is nearly stationary well south and west of Mexico. It will continue to move slowly right into the weekend. It is unlikely that the storm will survive the weekend as it is expected to encounter significant wind shear. We are also monitoring a cluster of thunderstorms just east of Rosa. This area remains unorganized and strong wind shear over the next couple of days will limit development. Elsewhere, there are no major concerns for development in the remainder of the basin. By AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Dave Samuhel

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Nov 29, 2012 8:11 pm  Reply with quote  

With just about 24 hours left, the “2012 Hurricane Season” has just about come to an end, ending officially tomorrow November 30 2012.

Presently, “Sandy” will be remembered as the storm of the season, if not the century, as it's destruction was as impact full if not greater than that of “Katrina” for the Gulf States in 2005. Prayers for the dead & those still suffering from the losses “Sandy” inflicted on the East Coast states.

For the last seven years this watcher has tried to remain vigilant in watching & reporting on these storms hoping to document any anomalous behavior associated with any of them, and over the years I believe there have been some successes. I have no misconceived notions of whom I think is doing what to whom, so I won't make any such claims. I do personally believe that some of what we have been witnessing & documenting over the years has been & is being manipulated by men, & far beyond the realm of just chemtrails. That said, I won't go on any further speculating as to who is responsible for what, as I am not able to prove any such claims. I am not a scientist, or meteorologist nor have I ever claimed to be such. I am just an individual observer or a so called self appointed “watcher”, who believes as many others do that some as yet unidentifiable individuals are successfully manipulating the atmosphere and there-by some of these storm systems through the use of some new modern and as of yet secret technologies some refer to as “HAARP like” or “Tesla tech” type sciences. I will not debate the issue of who is doing what to whom and with what, as I do not believe there is just one player in this game, nor any real (as of yet) ascertainable proof to say with any certainty who is responsible for what & exactly how...

As it stands, I will personally continue to observe or WATCH on my own, and possibly post further observations of what I consider anomalous events but as of now, & after seven years of following these storms and making these reports I believe it is time to take a step back from all of this and just observe on the sideline and end these “Hurricane Watch” threads... If anyone else would like to carry them on feel free to do so, for now and the unforeseeable future I believe I am done doing them. If any storms arise post season this year I will post reports & images, but beyond that for now I'm out...

May God keep an “eye” on everyone involved...
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