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FIGHTING BACK #36

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nsasucks





Joined: 02 Jan 2001
Posts: 526
Location: Earth
FIGHTING BACK #36 PostTue Apr 10, 2001 9:50 pm  Reply with quote  

In a previous FB, we discussed that one of the many ways you might be surveilled and not know it, is because there was no physical presence to detect. In this digital age, all a federal agency has to do is assign all the various routers that has your name on it, to come home to a collection point, where it is sorted, referenced, cross-linked with other outside agencies, etc.

This is all done without any effort from a human being.

In point of fact, it was stated that your cell phones and pagers were already "transponder equipped." That means that as long as it is battery supplied, they can tri-angulate your near-exact position. Again, without human hands.

One other little happy tidbit they do for us, is they place two or more transponders in your cars. They occassionaly admit to these invasion of civil privacy. As the following article attests.

ATF Admits Tracking Jim Bell
by Declan McCullagh

10:20 a.m. Apr. 6, 2001 PDT

TACOMA, Washington -- The government revealed Thursday that it implanted a satellite-tracking device in a suspect's car and tracked him as he drove around Oregon and Washington.

Brian Meyer, a special agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, testified that he installed a GPS bug last November in a Nissan Maxima owned by defendant Jim Bell.

Meyer told a fascinated jury that the device -- "high quality, something that military and law enforcement uses" -- continually transmitted Bell's exact location using a radio signal to receivers operated by law enforcement. Federal agents used graphical mapping software on a PC to plot Bell's movements in real time.

Political essayist Bell is on trial here this week in a case that involves his alleged use of legally obtained CD-ROMs to compile information about Treasury Department agents.

He is not accused of directly threatening them, but the government says that by collecting information about agents by driving to their suspected residences and by refusing to renounce his writings about how to assassinate unethical federal employees, Bell is guilty of violating stalking laws.

The government hopes to prove that Bell crossed state lines when driving from Vancouver, Washington along I-205 to 14135 S. Clackamas Drive in Oregon City, Oregon. That address is the current home of Christopher John Groener, who testified on behalf of the prosecution, and the former residence of ATF agent Mike McNall.

In interviews with journalists, Bell spoke at length last year about how he believed that McNall -- the chief investigator in a case involving fellow prisoner Ryan Lund -- offered Lund a shorter prison term in exchange for assaulting Bell. McNall on Thursday denied it.

McNall said he started to worry about Bell after fellow Treasury Department agent Jeff Gordon -- the lead investigator and alleged victim -- told him about Bell's anti-federal government political views. "I was told of Mr. Bell's background, the 'Assassination Politics' he was the alleged author of, the Sarin gas thing, his background in chemistry, him being a graduate of MIT," McNall said.

Bell is not charged with unlawful ownership of any chemicals, including Sarin gas. But one prosecution witness, Robert East, said Bell once told him he owned the necessary chemical ingredients to make it.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Robb London said the government did not want to release "technical details" about how the GPS bug works or where it was in Bell's car because future suspects may know enough about the system to remove it.

But while this appears to be the first criminal prosecution in which a GPS transmitter has been used, many companies manufacture the devices.

The feds appear to be using TeleType's GPS CDPD Tracker, which is smaller than a laptop computer and includes a built-in Uniden CDPD modem that can also transmit the vehicle's location to any e-mail address.

"This option is especially suitable for private investigators wishing to track a vehicle covertly," the company's website says. "The GPS/CDPD option is also beneficial for tracking of entire fleets of vehicles with minimal hardware investment per vehicle since no computer is required in the vehicle. Each vehicle can be tracked by anyone at the central office."

Another device is the ATTI Shadow Tracker, which retails for $375 and is a passive unit, meaning it only records the vehicle's location and never transmits. A law enforcement agency must retrieve the business-card sized device and connect it to a PC to download its location information.

The Spy Store sells a GPS cellular phone for $1,300 that also allows constant tracking of its whereabouts.

On Thursday, Gordon testified that Bell participated in a discussion on the cypherpunks mailing list last year entitled "Judges Needing Killing." The participants apparently intended it as a way to rile the feds -- they suspected Gordon was monitoring the conversation -- but Gordon didn't see it that way.

"Anything with a title like 'Judges Needing Killing' is something that will catch my attention as a law enforcement officer," Gordon said.

Gordon said that Bell "doesn't care what the current law is. He believes he can retaliate against the government for anything he believes is unjust."

The government has called about 15 witnesses so far, and is expected to end its case by Friday. Then it's the defense's turn, but U.S. District Judge Jack Tanner has denied all subpoenas they have sent to witnesses, leading observers to speculate the defense case will be very short.

source: http://www.wired.com/news/politics/0,1283,42895,00.html


ANOTHER ARTICLE ON THE SAME CASE

Man Found Guilty Of Making
Feds 'Nervous' http://civilliberty.about.com/newsissues/civilliberty/library/weekly/aa041101a.htm
4-17-1

Jim Bell has been probed, raided and arrested. He spent time in prison for "obstructing" Internal Revenue Service agents and using a false Social Security number. Now Bell has been convicted for - get this - stalking government arm-twisters.

Stalking? Well ... that's what they call it. Bell gathered the sort of information on them that they compiled on him - and many, many other people - for years. For that offense, the feds decided to send Bell away again, and they did everything in their power to fix the trial.

A cypherpunk and libertarian, Bell originally got official skirts in a bind when he penned Assassination Politics, a provocative think piece that postulated an Internet-based system for anonymously rewarding people who knock off abusive government officials. All hot and bothered by the article, the feds made Bell a target of an intense investigation. Soon, he was an unwilling guest of the government, and the powers that be thought they were done with yet one more thorn in their sides.

Well, some thorns grow back. Outraged by his treatment, upon his release, Bell began compiling information on the agents who had previously put his life under the microscope - in particular, a Treasury Department agent by the name of Jeff Gordon (Jeff.Gordon@tigta.treas.gov). To find evidence backing his claim that he's been the target of illegal surveillance, Bell openly purchased motor vehicle databases and performed Internet searches in a mirror image of the sort of scrutiny to which he was subjected. Well, a crude sort of mirror image, since Bell doesn't have access to the resources and neat-o toys with which the feds play.

And those toys are neat, indeed. An agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms admitted that Bell's car was tagged with a transmitter that monitored his location for the edification of agents who tracked his every move with mapping software.

All this for a fellow who originally attracted attention for penning a strongly worded, heavily philosophical, anti-government screed.

The BATF's admission that agents spent their time watching a pamphleteer's trips to the grocery store came during the course of the latest trial, and that's another story in itself.

Bell was charged for his data-gathering under a statute penalizing anybody who crosses a state line "with the intent to injure or harass another person." But a trial isn't just a chance for officials to shuffle a few papers around while a scaffold is hammered together in the public square. The defendant is supposed to have a chance to present his argument, and perhaps demonstrate that the prosecution is off-base, overzealous, or just plain wrong. This requires that the defendant have legal representation and access to witnesses and evidence.

That's where matters turned odd. The government was happily knocking together that scaffold and didn't want any diversions along the way - diversions such as an adequate defense. Bell was represented by Robert Leen, an attorney in who he apparently has no faith and who he tried to fire - to no effect, since the court essentially ignored Bell. Bell claimed that his lawyer admitted to having been threatened by officials, and that Leen colluded with prosecutor Robb London and Judge Jack Tanner to hurry things along with no more than a nominal defense offered to slow the rush of events.

Bell's assertions about his attorney appeared in a series of court documents he himself prepared. In them, he made no pretense of legal knowledge - he admits that he's completely unqualified to act in any formal capacity in court at all. The readings are eccentric and acerbic and very funny, if lacking in legal niceties. Whatever the truth of Bell's representations about his relationship with his lawyer, it's clear that they went through the trial barely on speaking terms, and that made for a shaky defense.

It's also clear that Judge Jack Tanner did his best to block Bell's access to information that might support his case. In his filings with the court, Bell complained that the government denied him documents that might bolster his defense, on the grounds that they contain identifying information about federal agents.

Why it would be so dangerous for Bell, who wasn't charged with any violent crime, to have such data is unclear. Nor is it apparent why allegedly sensitive information can't be redacted so that Bell can use the rest of the documents in his defense.

Likewise, Bell was unable to call witnesses. According to an article in Wired, "[Judge] Tanner has quashed all of Bell's subpoenas for defense witnesses."

The list of prosecution witnesses, on the other hand, was a long one indeed. It even included reporters who covered the case and who had to be dragged unwillingly into court.

The conduct of the trial became even more curious when Judge Tanner threatened contempt charges against any news operation that mentioned the names of jurors - names that were available from documents posted on the Web by the court itself. That blanket publication ban raised the ire of free speech advocates.

Also sparking discussion was the use by the prosecution of agent Gordon, an alleged "victim" of Bell's inquiries, as the chief investigator in the case. That's a highly unusual and quite possibly unethical move, since it raises the possibility of revenge rather than law motivating the prosecution.

The bizarre nature of the case didn't even end with the verdict, since the jury hung 11-1 on three of the five charges, and convicted on two. One of the guilty verdicts came on a charge of sending a single harassing fax message to Agent Gordon.

Wow. Treasury agents are apparently sensitive types, so you'd better watch those nastygrams to the I.R.S. around April 15.

Whatever the paper charges, Jim Bell was clearly arrested and prosecuted for loudly criticizing the government and for being abrasive and unrelenting in the process. Bell may be something of an eccentric, but he had enough moxie to make federal agents nervous.

That's the worst crime as far as any government official is concerned.




[Edited 1 times, lastly by nsasucks on 04-17-2001]
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nsasucks





Joined: 02 Jan 2001
Posts: 526
Location: Earth
PostTue Apr 17, 2001 8:14 am  Reply with quote  

Did you notice what else this article is telling you?

That the feds monitor chat boards and record every post...

...to be used against you...


...later...

...when they fabricate bogus charges against you to shut you up.


Pay attention to the details. You do not live in a country with free speech.
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