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2008 HURRICANE WATCH

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Oct 16, 2008 12:01 am  Reply with quote  

Hurricane Omar is not behaving as it was predicted to earlier this morning, it has intensified much faster than was expected by the experts, and the experts now say, “During late Wednesday afternoon Hurricane Omar intensified and the surface pressure dropped to 969 millibars which is a 16 millibar drop in less than 12 hours. This almost classifies this as a rapidly intensifying hurricane. If the pressure in Omar continues to fall rapidly the hurricane could become a category 3 or major hurricane.”
Look out Virgin Islanders; it looks like “Omar” is now targeting you…
I might have said it had it's "EYE" on you, but it doesn't seem to have a defined one at this point in time, "eye" that is...
Here is the last visible before dark this evening…



http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Omar Closing in on the Virgin Islands, TD 16 remains weak
Omar has intensified to a category 2 hurricane with winds of 100 mph. Omar continues to approach the Leeward Islands including the Virgin Islands. As of 6:00 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Omar was located near 16.2 north, 66.3 west, or about 140 miles southwest of St. Croix. The storm is moving to the northeast at 15 mph. Maximum sustained winds have increased to 100 mph, making Omar a Category 2 hurricane. The central pressure measured by a U.S. reconnaissance aircraft was 969 millibars, or 28.61 inches of mercury. out 15 miles from the center, while tropical storm-force winds extend outward 115 miles mostly on the east side of the storm.
A hurricane warning is in effect for the U. S. Virgin Islands, St. Maarten, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Barthelemy, the British Virgin Islands, Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis, Vieques and Culebra.
A tropical storm warning and hurricane watch is in effect for Puerto Rico, St. Kitts and Nevis. This might be upgraded to a hurricane warning for St. Kitts and Nevis. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Antigua, Barbuda and Montserrat and could be changed to a hurricane warning overnight if Omar tracks a bit more to the east.
A tropical storm watch is in effect for Guadeloupe.
During late Wednesday afternoon Hurricane Omar intensified and the surface pressure dropped to 969 millibars which is a 16 millibar drop in less than 12 hours. This almost classifies this has a rapidly intensifying hurricane. If the pressure in Omar continues to fall rapidly the hurricane could become a category 3 or major hurricane.
Omar will move on a general northeastward track tonight. The westerly upper-level wind that has been shearing Omar has weakened some. This along with very warm water and no dry air intrusion has lead to Omar's strengthening. A weak upper level low forming over the Dominican Republic caused Omar to move more to the east for a time during Wednesday afternoon. This feature continues to exert a more westerly steering flow and some shear over the hurricane. But eventually this feature will lift northeast. Based on this Omar is forecast to pass over or just east of St. Croix between 1 AM and 4 AM early Thursday morning as a strong category 2 or category 3 hurricane. The hurricane will pass east within 30-60 miles of St Thomas and St. John. This will bring winds of at least 100 mph over that island, with possible gusts of 120 mph. The storm will produce excessive rainfall of 5-10 inches, with isolated amounts of 20 inches possible over all Leeward Islands. Battering surf, and a storm surge of 3-5 feet is expected for the islands in the path of Omar. The extremely rough surf and storm surge could produce waves of around 20 feet. These waves will create severe beach erosion an flooding along coastal areas of these islands. Bays facing south or east will be most vulnerable to flooding of 3-5 feet. People living in these low lying areas are at the greatest risk for life threatening flooding. Conditions will deteriorate into Wednesday night and early Thursday moring, with the worst of the hurricane occurring around midnight through daybreak early Thursday morning.
At 5 p.m. EDT, Tropical Depression 16 was located near 15.5 north, 85.4 west or about 25 miles south-southeast of Limon, Honduras. T.D. 16 has maximum sustained winds of 35 mph and is moving to the west at 7 mph and is moving inland over Honduras. The main threat from the depression will be excessive rainfall. It will bring 4-8 inches of rainfall over northeastern Nicaragua and northern Honduras with local totals of 15 inches. This much rainfall will lead to life-threatening flash floods and mudslides in some places. There is only a small chance that Tropical Depression will become a tropical storm.
A tropical storm warning is in effect from for the southern Belize coast south to the Guatemala border. A tropical storm watch is in effect for the east coast of Guatemala.
Elsewhere in the tropics, there are several features to monitor. The remnants of Nana and another small area of low pressure trailing it by 150 miles or so remain devoid of thunderstorms and it is unlikely that this disorganized area will regenerate or for the other low to develop. These features will move off to the northeast in the far east Atlantic over the next few days steered by the same upper-level trough that is steering Omar northeastward.
A cluster of thunderstorms can be found in the Gulf of Mexico just east of the Texas Coastal Bend; this is associated with an upper-level low. This feature is pulling in tropical moisture, but it is unlikely that this feature will become an organized tropical cyclone. It will cause the development of rain and thunderstorms with heavy downpours into South Texas through Thursday; the heaviest of the rain will fall when a front now over central Texas moves into this very moist area.
Tropical waves along 60b west and 42 west are causing spotty thunderstorms, but they are disorganized. Upper-level westerly winds are causing shear that will keep the waves disorganized as they slowly track westward.
By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologists Alex Sosnowski and Dan Kottlowski

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Oct 16, 2008 2:18 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane Omar has reached an impressive CAT 3 status, qualifying it as a “Major Hurricane”. I think this is the first hurricane of this caliber I can remember seeing with no centric eye formation. Anyway, the storm is moving away from the Caribbean Islands after pounding them with excessive wind, rain, and surf at a pretty quick clip, a reported 29 mph now, with recorded wind speeds upward of 115 mph, and it is now headed to the northeast in the open Atlantic.
God speed “Omar”………


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Major Hurricane Omar Moving Across West-Central Atlantic
Omar is a Category 3 hurricane with winds of 115 mph. At 8:00 a.m. EDT Thursday morning, Omar was located near 20.3 north and 62.4 west, or about 160 miles north-northeast of the northern Leeward Islands. The storm is moving to the northeast at 29 mph. The central pressure measured by a U.S. reconnaissance aircraft was 967 millibars, or 28.53 inches of mercury. Hurricane-force winds extend outward 35 miles from the center, while tropical storm-force winds extend outward 115 miles, mostly on the east side of the storm.
A hurricane warning is in effect for St. Maarten, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Barthelemy and Anguilla.
A tropical storm warning and hurricane watch are in effect for the islands of St. Kitts and Nevis. A tropical storm warning is in effect for Antigua, Barbuda and Montserrat.
Omar will move on a general northeastward track today. Omar passed east of St. Croix, and wind gusts to near 60 mph were reported on the island. Omar tracked to the northeast across the Anegada Passage last night, between the British Virgin Islands and Anguilla in the northern Leeward Islands. Hurricane conditions with heavy rain, high winds and pounding surf buffeted these islands. The storm produced excessive rainfall of 5-10 inches, with isolated amounts of 20 inches on the Virgin Islands and the northern Leeward Islands. Battering surf with a storm surge of 3-5 feet pounded the islands in the path of Omar. The extremely rough surf and storm surge produced waves of around 20 feet. These waves created severe beach erosion and flooding along the coast.
Tropical Depression 16 has weakened to a tropical rainstorm over northern Honduras. As of 11 p.m. EDT Tuesday, it was located near 15.3 north and 85.9 west, or about 40 miles south-southwest of Limon, Honduras, and it ceased to be a named storm. Maximum sustained winds are 30 mph, and movement is to the west-southwest at 7 mph. The main threat from the tropical rainstorm will be excessive rainfall, with 4-8 inches forecast for northern Nicaragua westward across Central America, and local totals of 15 inches. This much rainfall will lead to life-threatening flash floods and mudslides in places.
Elsewhere in the tropics, there are several features to monitor. The remnants of Nana and another small area of low pressure trailing it by 150 miles or so remain devoid of thunderstorms, and it is unlikely that this disorganized area will regenerate, or the other low develop. These features will move off to the northeast in the far eastern Atlantic over the next few days steered by the same upper-level trough that is steering Omar northeastward.
A couple of thunderstorms can be found in the Gulf of Mexico just east of the Texas Coastal Bend, associated with an upper-level low. This feature is pulling in tropical moisture, but unlikely to become an organized tropical cyclone. It will cause the development of rain and thunderstorms with heavy downpours in South Texas through the day; the heaviest rain will fall when a front now over central Texas moves into this very moist area.
Tropical waves along 61 west and 43 west are causing spotty thunderstorms, but are disorganized. Upper-level westerly winds are causing shear that will keep the waves disorganized as they slowly track westward.
By AccuWeather Meteorologist Kevin Witt

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Nov 01, 2008 1:37 pm  Reply with quote  

With only 30 days left to this years official hurricane season things are relatively quiet on all fronts for now and that is a good thing.
Here in Northern California we are again getting some much needed rain, I almost forgot what that sounded like.
Anyway, we will maintain the watch till the season ends, and probably then some, because you never know these days...
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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed Nov 05, 2008 2:58 pm  Reply with quote  

This one nearly passed by the attention of this watcher, although it has reached a level of intensity strong enough to qualify it for a name, it by no means has become any severe threat at this point in time, at number 16 for the season out west in the East Pacific its “Polo”…

quote:

Polo Dissipates
Little more than a wave of showers and thunderstorms at this time, what is left of Polo will continue on a westward path through the eastern Pacific. No more concerns are expected with this storm, if there were any before. Polo is not expected to restrengthen.
Elsewhere in the Eastern Pacific Basin, there are no other areas of concern.
By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Nov 06, 2008 2:43 pm  Reply with quote  

Things are getting stirred up out in the Caribbean Sea once again. Qualifying as this years 16th named system on the Atlantic side (keeping up with the number of storms named on the Pacific side) it’s Tropical Storm “Paloma”. It presently appears that the experts expect this storm to also reach hurricane classification some time this week. The current projected storm paths take it on a course toward Cuba and then out in to the Atlantic southwest of Florida; we will continue “watching” as things progress…

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Tropical Storm Paloma
Tropical Depression 17 organized enough early Thursday to garner tropical storm status. Now, Tropical Storm Paloma will continue slowly on a northward path and remain in favorable areas for further development. Paloma is expected to reach hurricane status in the central Caribbean in the next few days.
A tropical storm watch is in effect from Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, northward to Limon, Honduras.
As of 7:00 a.m. EST, Thursday, Tropical Storm Paloma was located at 15.3 north and 82.2 west or about 70 miles east-northeast of the Nicaragua/Honduras border. It has an estimated central minimum pressure of 1000 mb or 29.53 inches. The system was moving northwest at 7 mph and will deliver up to 6 inches of rain on eastern Honduras and northeastern Nicaragua over the next 12 to 24 hours. Thunderstorms and outflow has increased over the past 12 hours, indicating the wind shear is decreasing and the system is becoming stronger. Maximum sustained winds are 40 mph with higher gusts.
The system is expected to stay south of the Florida Peninsula, but rain bands could reach as far north as the Keys and parts of South Florida.
The rest of the tropical Atlantic remains quiet.
By AccuWeather Meteorologist Matthew Rinde

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Nov 07, 2008 2:58 pm  Reply with quote  

“Paloma” is now officially a category 1 class HURRICANE!!! And, it appears that some Cuban provinces may one more time this season have their spirits tested by a major HURRICANE!!! The experts are predicting this storm may intensify upwards of a CAT 3 classification before slamming somewhere onto the Island of Cuba. Other Islands of the Caribbean (see report) are also being given warning to monitor this storms progression and to be prepared in the event of any changes in its status and course.
Once again, we offer our prayers and best wishes for any soul’s who may be in harms way, keep your eyes wide open and your heads down if this thing comes your way…
HURRICANE!!!

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic


quote:

Hurricane Paloma
Paloma continues to be a Category 1 hurricane with winds of 75 mph. The hurricane will move north, passing over or very close to the Cayman Islands on Friday. It will make landfall over east-central or eastern Cuba on Sunday.
A hurricane warning is in effect for the Cayman Islands.
As of 4:00 a.m. EST, Friday, Hurricane Paloma was located at 17.8 north, 81.7 west or about 100 miles south of Grand Cayman and about 325 miles west of Kingston, Jamaica. Paloma has a central minimum pressure of 981 mb or 28.97 inches. The storm was moving north at 9 mph with maximum sustained winds of 80 mph along with higher gusts.
Paloma continues to intensify due to low shear, warm water and no important interaction with land. The area where Paloma is located is historically a favorable area for strengthening during October and November. Since we see no change in the environment around the system, Paloma should intensify further Friday, becoming a Category 2 storm. It is probable that Paloma could end up strengthening to a Category 3 hurricane before making landfall over Cuba on Sunday.
Paloma is being steered by winds on the west side of a large upper-level high pressure area over the eastern Caribbean. The oval shaped high will cause Paloma to turn more north-northeast during the day Friday, then more northeast Friday night and Saturday. On this course the system is expected to hit the Cayman Islands on Friday with hurricane-force winds. Paloma will bring a 4- to 8-foot storm surge along with large and battering waves to these islands. Rainfall will average 6-12 inches. Once Paloma moves away from the Cayman Islands the system will take aim for east central Cuba. The system will make landfall over east central Cuba around midday on Sunday as a Category 2 or Category 3 hurricane. Hurricane-force winds, torrential, perhaps life threatening rainfall will affect eastern Cuba during Sunday. Paloma will start to experience increased shear on Sunday. That along with interaction with land will cause Paloma to weaken considerably Sunday afternoon and Sunday night. By the time Paloma reaches the central Bahamas on Monday it should be a tropical storm. Beyond Monday, Paloma will transition from a pure tropical system into a non-tropical system sometime on Tuesday and Tuesday night. The storm could pass close to Bermuda Wednesday night and Thursday of next week.
The major effects of Paloma are expected to stay south of the Florida Peninsula, but rain bands could reach as far north as the Keys.
Interests in the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Cuba and the Bahamas are advised to keep abreast of the strength and path of Paloma.
The rest of the tropical Atlantic remains quiet.
By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Nov 08, 2008 3:34 pm  Reply with quote  

LOOK OUT CUBA!!!
Hurricane Paloma has become A MAJOR HURRICANE WITH A CLASSIFICATION OF A CATEGORY 4 IN INTENSIFICATION (sustained wind speeds of 140 mph with gust up to 170 mph), and this thing got up to that speed in a hurry (see yesterdays reports). There are some interesting pictures available on some servers presently; I have captured a few for viewing here. The smaller image below reveals a starry eyed center in the storm, (literally) where as in the larger image there is less definition but still a star like shape.???
This storm currently is presenting KILLER conditions and should be considered a MAJOR THREAT to all souls in its path. It has been predicted by the experts that it will “likely” maintain its strength over the day as it heads directly for Cuba, then the track maps indicate it may shift slightly after passing over Cuba to the north…
All eyes on the storm, May God protect those in its way…….


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Major Hurricane Paloma
Paloma, a Category 4 hurricane has maximum-sustained winds of 140 mph with gusts of 170 mph. Paloma will likely maintain its strength over the next 12-18 hours as it approaches Cuba.
A hurricane warning is in effect for the Cayman Islands. A hurricane warning is also in effect for the Sancti Spiritus, Ciego De Avila, Camaguey and Las Tunas provinces of Cuba. A tropical storm warning and a hurricane watch are in effect for Granma Province in Cuba. Now, tropical storm warnings are also out for Holguin and Santiago De Cuba and a tropical storm watch is in effect for the central Bahamas.
As of 7:00 a.m. EST on Friday, Hurricane Paloma was located at 19.7 north and 79.6 west, or just to the southeast of Cayman Brac. Paloma had a central minimum pressure of 943 mb, or 27.85 inches. The storm was moving northeast at 8 mph.
Paloma is a very well organized, dangerous hurricane with a well-formed eye and a compact swirl structure of the eye wall. Warm waters, low wind shear and venting aloft will continue to favor slight intensification on Friday night. The area where Paloma is located is historically a favorable area for during November.
Paloma is being steered by winds on the west side of a large upper-level high pressure area over the eastern Caribbean. The oval shaped high will combine with an upper trough of low pressure crossing the northern Gulf of Mexico to cause Paloma to turn more to the northeast on Friday night and Saturday.
Paloma will bring damaging hurricane-force winds, 12- to 17-foot storm surge, along with large, battering waves to the Cayman Islands through early Friday night. Rainfall will average 6-12 inches. The system will make landfall over east-central Cuba on Sunday, most likely as a major hurricane with a storm surge up to 12 feet. Hurricane-force winds and torrential, perhaps life threatening, rainfall will buffet eastern Cuba on Sunday.
Paloma will start to experience increased shear on Sunday. That, along with interaction with Cuba, will cause Paloma to weaken considerably on Sunday afternoon and Sunday night. By the time Paloma approaches the central Bahamas on Monday, it should be a tropical storm with the upper half of the system sheared off, which will continue to weaken the tropical cyclone. Latest computer models are now stalling the low-level portions of the system over Cuba or the Bahamas next week as high pressure builds over the western Atlantic into the southeastern U.S. Strong upper-level shear will whisk the upper portion of Paloma off into the Atlantic. Still, the remnant low-level center of circulation of Paloma may bring gusty winds and rain to the Bahamas for several days next week.
The major effects of Paloma are expected to stay south of the Florida Peninsula through the weekend, but rain bands could reach as far north as the Keys and the Miami-Ft. Lauderdale area.
Interests in the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Cuba and the Bahamas are advised to keep abreast of the strength and path of Paloma.
The rest of the tropical Atlantic remains quiet.
By AccuWeather.com Expert Meteorologists Matthew Rinde and Katie Storbeck

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSun Nov 09, 2008 3:19 pm  Reply with quote  

After an earlier than initially predicted arrival on the shores of Cuba, packing a walloping CAT 3 or 4 classification (depending on who you believe because at this point reports differ) as it made it’s hit there, what was “Hurricane Paloma” is according to the experts “weakening” now as it has been “ripped” apart by the “combination of shear and land” as it passed over the Cuban Island. “Paloma” is now no longer classified as a hurricane, as quickly as it got up to speed it has lost it’s intensity and is now classified as a tropical storm system as it’s wind speeds have decreased below the 70 mph qualification point of hurricane status. The damage sustained is being assessed today, but early reports say power lines and phone service have been interrupted, as well as a “a major communications tower on the southern coast”(http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27561036).
Excessive rains have created flooded conditions for some areas that were already ravaged by storms hitting earlier this season, and hundreds of thousands were evacuated to higher ground to escape the flooding waters. Death tolls have yet to be reported, and hopefully are minimal.
On with the watch………
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Paloma Leaving Cuba, Weakening
Paloma made landfall around 6:20 p.m. on Saturday near Santa Cruz del Sur, Cuba, as a strong Category 3 Hurricane. As of 7 a.m., Paloma was located near 21.3 N and 77.8 W with maximum-sustained winds of 70 mph, making it a tropical storm now. Paloma had a central minimum pressure of 977 mb, or 28.85 inches and was moving north-northeast at 5 mph.
Cuba has discontinued all watches and warnings. Tropical storm warnings are out for the central Bahamas.
Paloma was a very well organized, dangerous hurricane with a well-formed eye before encountering Cuba. The storm brought damaging hurricane-force winds, a 20- to 25-foot storm surge, along with large, battering waves to Cuba. Rainfall averaged 6-12 inches. Paloma has slowed and the combination of shear and land has ripped it apart and it is weakening rapidly.
Paloma will continue to experience increased shear. That will cause Paloma to continue to weaken. By the time Paloma approaches the central Bahamas later on today and on Monday, it will be a tropical storm with the upper half of the system sheared off, which will continue to weaken the tropical cyclone. The latest computer models are now stalling the low-level portions of the system over the Bahamas next week as high pressure builds over the western Atlantic into the southeastern U.S. Strong upper-level shear will whisk the upper portion of Paloma off into the Atlantic. Still, the remnant low-level center of circulation of Paloma may bring gusty winds and rain to the Bahamas for several days next week.
Interests in Jamaica, Cuba and the Bahamas are advised to keep abreast of the strength and path of Paloma.
The rest of the tropical Atlantic remains quiet.
By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Andy Mussoline and Jonathan Pacheco

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon Nov 10, 2008 3:16 pm  Reply with quote  

The storm that was “Paloma” is now one for the record books, as it has literally been “ripped” apart and is no longer posing any real threats with respect to any further wind damage, although it is still considered a heavy rain maker for the region, for the most part the danger has passed. This storm had to have one of the fastest yet shortest lives of any Category 4 class hurricane in history, or at least I’m sure it is up there in the ranks. It appeared to be a storm hell bent on hitting Cuba, as it revved up to speed in a hurry, slammed into the tiny country and then just lost its steam as it headed back out to the Atlantic waters. Earlier in this season we had a hurricane zigzagging it’s way back and forth across the same Island, before revving up and heading for the Gulf Coast shores, so you won’t convince this watcher that the shape of the land mass alone is responsible for defusing the storm, thank God for wind shear;)………

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Paloma Sheared Apart
Paloma is not expected to cause any more harm with wind shear ripping the storm up. There can still be some heavier rain associated with the system, but winds are not expected to have an impact.
The rest of the tropical Atlantic remains quiet.
By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue Nov 11, 2008 3:00 pm  Reply with quote  

A couple of days post “Paloma”…
(photo displayed as it was captured, unedited)

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic



Maybe the season is officially over earlier???, we can only hope…
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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon Dec 01, 2008 7:34 pm  Reply with quote  

It appears that the “2008 Hurricane Season” will officially quietly end, as it is now December 1 2008 and November 30 is the day officially designated as the end of the year’s season. This does not necessarily mean there is no significant danger or threat from one of these beasts forming; it is just less likely based on past seasons and what is currently being monitored in the environment. However, the 2005 season serves as a reminder how that even into December these things can be spawned and wreak havoc.
For the record books, this year’s season has as well made its own historical marks by way of producing and delivering SIX consecutive “tropical cyclone” HITS on the United States. The experts say this is the first time this has ever happened or at least has been recorded since they began keeping records. They are also confident that no more “tropical cyclones” will develop over Atlantic waters, but do warn there is still potential lurking in the southern Caribbean due to the warmer temperatures of the waters there.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Atlantic Remains Quiet
The Atlantic Basin will close out the official 2008 Hurricane Season as the fourth most active on record. Sixteen named storms were recorded. Eight of these named storms were hurricanes. Five of these hurricanes were major hurricanes. The year 2008 will go down in history as the first season in which six consecutive tropical cyclones hit the United States.
Satellite images and data derived from satellite data suggest we will have no more tropical cyclones developing during the official end to the 2008 Hurricane Season. However, there can still be development over the next few weeks across the southern Caribbean, where waters will remain warm enough and upper-level winds will remain light. Current trends show no support for development in that area any time soon.
By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Bob Smerbeck




The Eastern Pacific waters are being reported as “Tranquil Tropics” (try saying that 3 times), and there is as well there, no further expected development of any major storms. The season there too appears to be ending with a quiet calm, and that is also a good thing.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:

Tranquil Tropics
The Eastern Pacific Tropical Basin remains void of any organized features. No development is expected across this tropical basin for the next few days. By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Mark Paquette



I for one am glad to see it officially end. We offer up our prayers for those who may have been adversely affected by any of these seasons’ storms, and may the Living God comfort you in your times of need, and may He receive The Souls of any Lives lost in the wake of the “2008 Hurricane Season”…
Although it has “officially” ended, we will continue to watch and report on anything significant that may develop over the rest of the year, and then on into “2009”…
May the Holiday Season be bright and filled with JOY!!!, and the New Year be a HAPPY!!! One…
God Bless us all, EVERYONE!!!

Out for now………STARMAN1



P.S.
This entire thread has been mirrored on a new site as well and can be viewed here…
(http://geomag.forumarena.com/geomag-thread31.html)
***edit****
Unfortunately, the previous site was lost in a server move incident, and cannot be recovered. Crying or Very sad
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