Chemtrail Central
Login
Member List
Image Database
Chemtrail Forum
Active Topics
Who's Online
Search
Research
Flight Explorer
Unidentifiable
FAQs
Phenomena
Disinformation
Silver Orbs
Transcripts
News Archive
Channelings
Etcetera
PSAs
Media
Vote


Chemtrail Central
Search   FAQs   Messages   Members   Profile
2008 HURRICANE WATCH

Post new topic Reply to topic
Chemtrail Central > Weather

Author Thread
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
2008 HURRICANE WATCH PostThu May 01, 2008 2:40 pm  Reply with quote  

Although the official start of the 2008 hurricane season remains a month away, something in the gut says its time to begin the watch early on, again, for this year’s season. It is hoped that nothing presents early on, but if something does we will be watching and reporting in earnest.

Here are the list of names for the storms of 2008...
Atlantic Storms:
Arthur, Bertha, Cristobal, Dolly, Edouard, Fay, Gustav, Hanna, Ike, Josephine, Kyle, Laura, Marco, Nana, Omar, Paloma, Rene, Sally, Teddy, Vicky, Wilfred

Pacific Storms:
Alma, Boris, Cristina, Douglas, Elida, Fausto, Genevieve, Hernan, Iselle, Julio, Karina, Lowell, Marie, Norbert, Odile, Polo, Rachel, Simon, Trudy, Vance, Winnie, Xavier, Yolanda, Zeke

Hoping no lives are lost in the wake of any of these storms, and the damge they cause are minimal, the watch begins again...
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
2008 Season opens early... PostThu May 29, 2008 11:08 pm  Reply with quote  

It is official; the 2008 hurricane season has begun early again this year. Not quite as early as reports were last year, but it has arrived again early, starting off once again in the East Pacific, south east of the Yucatan. This watcher observed a storm brew over that region just days ago that appeared as large and more severe, as far as satellite enhancement images revealed, but lacked the wind and spin showing up in this years first named storm, meet "Alma"...


quote:

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific
Tropical Storm Alma
Tropical Storm Alma, the first named storm of the 2008 eastern Pacific Ocean hurricane season, has made landfall near Leon, Nicaragua Thursday afternoon. Alma is located near 12.3 north and 87.0 west, or about 50 miles west-northwest at Managua, Nicaragua. It is moving to the north at 9 mph and maximum sustained winds were holding near 65 mph, but they will weaken throughout the evening as Alma moves farther Inland. Estimated minimum central pressure is 994 millibars, or 29.35 inches.

A Tropical Storm warning is in effect for the Pacific coasts of central America from Jaco, Costa Rica, northwestward including Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador.

The current satellite loop shows Alma has moved onshore along the Pacific coast of Nicaragua and continues to produce bands of convection around the center of circulation. Alma will weaken through tonight as it moves farther inland and encounters the higher terrain of northwest Nicaragua and eastern Honduras. Heavy flooding rain is the main threat from this storm across Central America, although tropical storm conditions will affect the upper coast of Nicaragua through early tonight. Mudslides and flooding rain of up to 15 inches will spread north and northwest across Central America over the next several days. Some of the higher terrain of Nicaragua and Honduras could receive up to 20 inches of rain causing life-threatening conditions in association with this storm.

Computer model consensus shows a track that would take Alma to the north over the next 24 hours and then to the northwest across Central America over the weekend. This track could possibly take Alma over the Caribbean between Belize and Honduras for a short time before a turn more to the northwest. A large ridge of high pressure over Texas will be nearly stationary through the weekend and this should deflect Alma more to the northwest and west after 24 hours.

Elsewhere across the eastern Pacific Basin, no tropical systems are expected to develop over the next several days.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologists Bob Smerbeck

We will be keeping a watchful eye on any further developments...
 View user's profile Send private message
WECWATURDOIN





Joined: 28 Mar 2006
Posts: 186
warfare PostFri May 30, 2008 10:10 pm  Reply with quote  

Alma's rains and flooding will devastate Nicaragua.

Nicaragua's seems to be targeted with weather warfare for their lack of safe access and crimes targeting foreigner's in the country.


http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_985.html
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSun Jun 01, 2008 1:33 am  Reply with quote  

It was hard to tell where Alma ended and Arthur began, but begin it did as the first named Atlantic storm of the 2008 hurricane season, it too begins a little early as well. Time to put the watch in full effect.

quote:

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic
Arthur Maintains Tropical Storm Strength
The Atlantic Basin hurricane season started one day early Saturday with the naming of Tropical Storm Arthur. Hurricane Season officially begins on June 1, but sometimes nature does not conform to the official boundaries of the Hurricane Season.

The moisture remains of Tropical Storm Alma were able to reorganize in the western Caribbean Sea Saturday afternoon, leading the formation of Tropical Storm Arthur. The storm is not named Alma because the center of circulation dissipated over the higher terrain of Central America on Friday.

As of 8 P.M. EDT, Arthur is located at 18.4N and 89.2W, approximately 55 miles west of Chetumal, Mexico. Maximum sustained winds are 40 mph with a central pressure of 1006 mb. The storm is moving west-northwest near 7 mph and will continue to slide through the Yucatan Peninsula Saturday night. Arthur will likely weaken as it moves over the peninsula, and this will result in it being downgraded to a tropical depression. Tropical Storm warnings remain in effect for the coast of Belize and for the east coast of Yucatan from Cabo Catoche southward to the border with Belize. These warning should be lifted by later Saturday night as the storm weakens.

The center of Arthur is forecast to come out over the Bay of Campeche on Sunday. Once back over water, it may strengthen once again to a tropical storm, and will need to be watched closely over the next few days. A strong upper-level ridge over the south-central US will continue to guide Arthur in a westerly direction through the Bay of Campeche Sunday and Monday. A second landfall is possible just south of Veracruz, Mexico by late Monday or Tuesday if redevelopment occurs.

Tropical waves along 82 west, 56 west and 42 west show no signs of development. A fourth tropical wave, which looks more impressive, is moving off the coast of Africa along 17 west.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Jonathan Pacheco and Andy Mussoline
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon Jun 02, 2008 2:32 am  Reply with quote  

Arthur update...

quote:
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic
Arthur Bringing Heavy Rain To Mexico
Hurricane season officially began today as Arthur brings heavy rain to areas of Mexico.

As of 5 p.m. EDT, Arthur remains a tropical depression after its downgrade earlier this morning from a tropical storm. Arthur's center of circulation is located at 17.7N and 91.1W, approximately 80 miles southeast of Cuidad Del Carmen, Mexico. Maximum-sustained winds are near 35 mph and movement is to west-southwest around 6 mph.

Arthur's most dangerous attribute continues to be the heavy rain associated with its tropical convection. An average of 5 to 10 inches of rain is expected to fall across the mountainous terrain of Belize, Guatemala and southern Mexico, causing flash flooding and mudslides.
A strong ridge of high pressure over the south-central United States will keep all threats from this storm away from the lower 48. Arthur will weaken as it continues to track across southeastern Mexico; however, the heavy rainfall will remain a threat through at least Monday.

Tropical waves along 60 west and 49 west show no signs of development. A fourth tropical wave, which appears more impressive, is moving off the coast of Africa along 23 west.
By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Mike Pigott and Andy Mussoline



Here is a sat. vapor image that shows what is described in the previous quoted report.

Now what I find most amazing is that the "strong ridge of high pressure" which is outlined in the blue box is the most dense vapor area forming in the entire hemisphere, and it just happened to form out of the blue earlier above Oklahoma, and is just perfectly in a position to thwart "all threats" from tropical depression Arthur, "away from the lower 48", or for that matter any other threat that may form.
There is also a mild notable rotation formed to the east of Florida that is visible in this vapor image as well, but no mention of it yet from the experts.
The "strong ridge of high pressure over the south-central United States" will be worth keeping an eye on, since it is in a position to keep the lower 48 states safe from "all threats from this strom."
Freeking amazing how it all works ain't it???
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Jun 27, 2008 2:14 pm  Reply with quote  

The seasons second named Pacific storm has officially been named, "BORIS". Official reports from accuweather are not yet up to date. So for now here is an image of the storm as it begins to develop.
Keeping a watchful eye out as this and other storms develop...
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Jun 28, 2008 2:28 am  Reply with quote  

Here is the report on Boris from accuweather's professionals...
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storm Boris No Threat to Land, Depression 3E Forms
Tropical Storm Boris is located near 13.3 north, 109.8 west, or about 555 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. As of 2 p.m. PDT, Boris had a central pressure of 1,000 millibars, or 29.53 inches of mercury. Maximum sustained winds have increased to 50 mph, with wind gusts as high as 60 mph. Boris was moving northwest at about 9 mph. This general motion is expected to continue over the next few days, posing no threat to any land. Some further strengthening is also possible over the next couple of days as well, allowing Boris to approach hurricane strength Saturday before upper-level winds increase over Boris and cause the storm to weaken on Sunday. Farther west of this storm, another area of low pressure has become the third tropical depression of the eastern Pacific Hurricane season. Tropical depression 3E was located near 13.5 north,123.0 west or about 1,075 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Maximum sustained winds are near 35 mph and the minimum central pressure is 1,007 millibars or 29.74 inches. If this system continues to intensify it could become tropical storm Christina on Saturday. This system is also moving west at about 9 mph. This system should stay well away from land over the next 5 days. Computer models are suggesting a third tropical cyclone might start to form well east of Boris due south of Acapulco within the next 2-3 days. At this point we see no organized activity in this general area. However, a tropical wave approaching 95 west is causing a large area of showers and thunderstorms from the Yucatan of Mexico southward to Nicaragua. This activity will move into the eastern Pacific over the weekend and could wrap up into an organized system by Monday of next week. By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSun Jun 29, 2008 1:38 pm  Reply with quote  

Two (Boris) and Three (Christina) running together in the Pacific, but appear to be no threat to any land at this point in time.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Boris, Christina, and a Third Developing
As of Sunday morning, Boris and Christina continued as tropical storms in the Eastern Pacific. Boris is located at 15.0 N and 115.4 W and is moving west at 9 mph. Current wind speeds are 50 mph with gusts up to 65 mph. Central pressure is 29.53 inches. This storm is moving into an environment of strong shear and is expected to move over cooler waters in the next couple of days. This should weaken the storm. Boris' younger sister Christina is at 14.6 N and 126.8 W, actually out ahead of Boris. Christina is also moving west at 9 mph. Winds are sustained at 45 mph and gusting to 60 mph. Central pressure is 29.59 inches. Christina is weakening a bit and is already feeling the effects of the cooler sea surface. The storm is expected to weaken to a tropical rainstorm by Monday. Neither Boris nor Christina pose any threat to land. Computer models are suggesting a third tropical cyclone might start to form well east of Boris, due south of Acapulco within the next two days. At this point we see no organized activity in this general area. However, a tropical wave approaching 97 west is causing a large area of showers and thunderstorms from southern Mexico southward into Guatemala. This activity will move into the eastern Pacific later on Sunday and could wrap up into an organized system by Monday. By AccuWeather Meteorologists Dave Houk and Eric Reese.

So far the Atlantic and Caribbean regions remains relatively quiet and slow for any early storm development...
Eyes wide open as we move into the second month of this years hurricane season.
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon Jun 30, 2008 3:54 pm  Reply with quote  

Still out in the Eastern Pacific, the experts are saying "Boris" and "Christina" pose no threat to land. Although, "Boris" might yet well become a hurricane anyway, even though its "environment is not ideal for strengthening" but if it does "it will be short lived". We'll just have to watch and see what develops or not...
Here is the latest report.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Boris Strengthening, Cristina Less Organized
As of Monday morning, Boris and Cristina continued as tropical storms in the Eastern Pacific. Boris is located at 14.9 N and 119.4 W and is moving west at 13 mph. Current wind speeds are 70 mph with gusts up to 80 mph. Central pressure is 29.29 inches. Boris' environment is not ideal for strengthening, but it does have a chance to become a hurricane anyway. If the storm does intensify, it will be short-lived. Cristina is at 14.2 N and 129.9 W, actually out ahead of Boris. Cristina is moving west at 10 mph. Winds are sustained at 45 mph and gusting to 55 mph. Central pressure is 29.59 inches. Cristina is becoming less organized and is feeling the effects of shear. Neither Boris nor Cristina pose any threat to land. Computer models are suggesting a third tropical cyclone might start to form well east of Boris, due south of Acapulco within the next two days. At this point we see no organized activity in this general area, but the environment is conducive for development. By AccuWeather Meteorologist Eric Reese.

Still quiet on the Eastside of Texas and Florida, oh yea and out there in North Carolina, (Deb and Jack's first real season on the coast), good luck and God Bless us all, everyone...
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue Jul 01, 2008 2:44 pm  Reply with quote  

The 2008 seasons first official hurricane is "Boris", who got up to speed in the early hours this Tuesday morning out in the Eastern Pacific. Experts don't expect this one to hang around long, and still have issued no warning of any potential threat to land.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Boris Becomes a Hurricane
As of early on Tuesday at 2 a.m. PDT, Boris became a Hurricane and it is expected to hold this strength for a short time, then slowly diminish over the next few days. Boris is located at 14.6 N and 124.2 W, or about 1,095 miles west to southwest of the southern tip of Baja California, and is moving west at 14 mph. Current wind speeds are 75 mph with gusts up to 90 mph. Central pressure is 29.21 inches. Cristina is a tropical depression and will not gather any strength. A third tropical cyclone might start to form well east of Boris, due south of Acapulco within the next day or days. Thunderstorm activity in this region was slowly becoming better organized. By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed Jul 02, 2008 3:18 am  Reply with quote  

"Boris" already downgraded to tropical storm...
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storm Boris; New Tropical Cyclone to Form?
As of 3 p.m. PDT Tuesday afternoon, Boris had weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm and was located near 15.0 n and 125.3 w, approximately 1,150 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The latest sustained wind speeds were 69 mph with gusts to 86 mph, and minimum central pressure was at 29.26 inches. The eye of Boris had become more undefined Monday night, and the overall structure had become more asymmetric. Boris is expected to continue to weaken as it moves westward and encounters cooler sea surface temperatures over the next several days. A new tropical cyclone might start to form well east of Boris, due south of Acapulco within the next 24 to 36 hours. Thunderstorm activity in this region has slowly been becoming better organized and more consolidated as environmental conditions remain favorable for further development. By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Brian Edwards and Heather Buchman
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed Jul 02, 2008 1:55 pm  Reply with quote  

This thing can't make up its mind, "Boris" is a hurricane AGAIN...
Now cruising @ CAT1 but not expected to sustain itself for long.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Boris a Hurricane Again and Tropical Depression 4-E Strengthening
As of 2 a.m. PDT Wednesday, Boris had strengthened back into a Category 1 hurricane and was located near 15.9 north and 126.5 west, approximately 1,185 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The latest sustained wind speeds were 75 mph with gusts to 90 mph, and minimum central pressure was at 29.18 inches. Boris is expected weaken down to a tropical storm during the next 24 hours as it moves westward and encounters cooler sea surface temperatures. A general weakening trend is expected to continue over the next several days as Boris drifts to the west. As of 2 a.m. PDT Wednesday, T.D. 4-E was strengthening toward tropical storm status. Tropical Depression 4-E was located near 16.6 north and 107.4 west, approximately 265 miles southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico, and was moving northwest at 7 mph. Maximum-sustained winds were 35 mph with gusts to 45 mph and the minimum central pressure was 1006 mb or 29.71 inches. Tropical Depression 4-E is expected to become Tropical Storm Douglas later today as it continues to move northwest. By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Eric Leister
Click to Enlarge & Animate Boris
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Jul 03, 2008 2:44 am  Reply with quote  

"Boris" has been downgraded again, and once again has named company in the East Pacific ocean, (epac storm #4) "Douglas" is now spinning as well...
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storms Boris and Douglas
As of 2 p.m. PDT Wednesday, Boris was downgraded to a tropical storm and was located near 16.9 north, 127.8 west. This places the center of the storm approximately 1,235 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The estimated sustained wind speeds were 60 mph and minimum central pressure was at 29.38 inches. Boris will continue to move toward the west-northwest over the next few days, encountering cooler ocean water temperatures. This cooler water will continue to cause Boris to weaken. As of 2 p.m. PDT Wednesday, Tropical Storm Douglas was located near 18.1 north,108.3 west, or approximately 270 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Douglas was moving to the northwest at 8 mph and had a central pressure of 29.65 inches. Maximum estimated sustained winds were near 40 mph with wind gusts to 50 mph. Douglas is expected to continue to track to the northwest over the next day or two before taking a turn more to the west over the weekend. Some slight strengthening of the storm is possible over the next 24-48 hours but it should remain a tropical storm. Douglas should remain over open waters, however, some of the outer rain bands will impact the southern tip of Baja California as the storm passes by to the south and west. We are also watching an area of disturbed weather near 10 north, 94 west or 385 miles south of Puerto Angle, Mexico. This system is moving west at about 5 mph and is showing signs of organization. If this system continues to organize, it could become a tropical depression within the next 24-48 hours. Steering currents will keep this system on a west to west-northwest path for the next few days. By AccuWeather Meteorologists Alex Sosnowski and Dan Kottlowski

Here is a link for another site tracking these storms, with free access to satellite imagery of them as well.
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu Jul 03, 2008 2:09 pm  Reply with quote  

From the satellite imagery this morning "my guess" is these two are about done. "Douglas" appeared to be impressive as it got going yesterday, especially on the water vapor images. But it now appears to have lost it's steam over night and is quickly dissipating away. "Boris" also seems to be a past event at this point...
Still watching, and it looks like some storms are a brewing in the Atlantic now as well, stay tuned...


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storms Boris and Douglas
As of 2 a.m. PDT Thursday, Tropical Storm Boris was located near 17.3 north and 128.6 west. This places the center of the storm around 1,270 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The estimated sustained wind speed is near 50 mph and the minimum central pressure is 996 mb or 29.41 inches. Boris will continue to move toward the west-northwest over the next few days, encountering cooler ocean water temperatures. This cooler water will continue to cause Boris to weaken. As of 2 a.m. PDT Thursday, Tropical Storm Douglas was located near 19.6 north, 109.2 west, or approximately 320 miles west of Manzanillo, Mexico. Douglas was moving to the north-northwest at 9 mph and had a central pressure of 29.62 inches. Maximum estimated sustained winds were near 40 mph with wind gusts to 50 mph. Douglas will weaken to a depression over the next 12-24 hours as satellite imagery has shown a dramatic decrease in thunderstorms. Eventually, Douglas will turn westward in the next 48 hours as a depression or remnant low pressure area. We are also watching an area of disturbed weather near 11 north, 94 west or 385 miles south of Puerto Angel, Mexico. This system is moving northwest at about 7 mph and is showing signs of organization. If this system continues to organize, it could become a tropical depression within the next 24-48 hours. Steering currents will keep this system on a west to west-northwest path for the next few days. By AccuWeather Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Jul 04, 2008 2:28 pm  Reply with quote  

That didn't take long, the East Pacific is quickly quieting as "Boris" and "Douglas" have dissipated down to tropical rainstorms, "no worries" there...
Meanwhile out in the Atlantic, things have begun to pick up the pace. There is a new named storm, the second of the season for that region called "Bertha", which has the experts guessing again because their "computer" models can't seem to agree on the data... "Garbage in, garbage out", isn't that one of the first rules of computer programming???
For those who are interested in watching these types of events transpire, it might be extremely interesting to watch the developing weather patterns over the continental US during the next 10 days or so. I would recommend paying particular attention to the direction of flow these developing systems (over the US) take on, in relation to the position of the storm's ("Bertha") movement in the Atlantic, it might be something to watch...
Anyway, for what its worth, here is the report.
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:
Bertha Churning West-Northwest
As of 5:00 AM EDT, Bertha was centered near 14.2 north and 28.3 west, or about 315 miles west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands. Maximum sustained winds are 45 mph with gusts to 55 mph. The minimum central pressure is estimated near 1002 mb, or 29.59 inches. Bertha was moving to the west-northwest at 14 mph.

This track is expected to continue through the weekend. Bertha will churn through the open waters of the central Atlantic not affecting any landmass and may take on more of a northwesterly track later this weekend. This is highly dependent on a weakness developing in a large area of high pressure north and northwest of the storm. This high pressure area is helping to guide the storm. A weakness or split in this high pressure area would cause Bertha to turn more northwest and then move more northerly. However, computer forecasts do not agree on this. If a weakness does not develop, the high pressure will not split and Bertha will continue to move on a west-northwest course beyond Sunday. That would allow the storm to move into warmer waters and support strengthening. This would also put Bertha into the western Atlantic and perhaps on a path that would threaten Bermuda and even the East Coast of the United States later next week. However, this is highly uncertain, and Bertha will not be a concern to land until after the weekend.

Elsewhere in the tropical Atlantic, we are monitoring tropical waves along 50/51 west, along 69 west and along 81 west. These waves are mostly south of 20 north and are moving westward at an average pace of 6 degrees longitude per day. The tropical wave along 69 west developed a small lower-level circulation center, but strong westerly upper-level winds are creating too much shear over this system. Therefore, this system should remain disorganized for at least the next couple of days. As it tracks farther west, the shear might drop off as it reaches the southern Gulf of Mexico and the Bay of Campeche late Sunday and Sunday night.

By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologists Dan Kottlowski and Ken Clark



Last edited by starman1 on Tue May 19, 2009 12:02 am; edited 1 time in total
 View user's profile Send private message

Post new topic Reply to topic
Forum Jump:
Jump to:  
Goto page
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are GMT.
The time now is Sat Nov 18, 2017 1:02 am


  Display posts from previous:      




© 21st Century Thermonuclear Productions
All Rights Reserved, All Wrongs Revenged, Novus Ordo Seclorum, All Your Base