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2009 HURRICANE WATCH

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starman1





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2009 HURRICANE WATCH PostSat May 02, 2009 11:26 pm  Reply with quote  

It is nearly that time of year once again, time to "turn our eyes" toward the seas to keep the watch ever vigilant as the "2009 Hurricane Season" approaches. Although, it is still only early May and the season officially opens in June, it is prudent to be prepared for any early arrivals.
So then, letís take a look at the Storm's Names for this year's season.

Here is the line-up for the "Atlantic Region"...

Atlantic Storms:
Ana, Bill, Claudette, Danny, Erika, Fred, Grace, Henri, Ida, Joaquin, Kate, Larry, Mindy, Nicholas, Odette, Peter, Rose, Sam, Teresa, Victor, Wanda

And, these will be the names for the storms this season in the "East Pacific Region"...

Pacific Storms:
Andres, Blanca, Carlos, Dolores, Enrique, Felicia, Guillermo, Hilda, Ignacio, Jimena, Kevin, Linda, Marty, Nora, Olaf, Patricia, Rick, Sandra, Terry, Vivian, Waldo, Xina, York, Zelda

It is the sincerest wish of this observer that no lives are unnecessarily lost in the events these storms will present. It is also my prayer that all the innocence be protected by the Grace of God, and may the suffering these storms bring be eased, and the victimís comforted. May those whose lives are lost find their way home to HimÖ And, if these things/storms are being manipulated, beyond His Will and Nature, may the perpetrators responsible suffer His Wrath for their crimes.........

Eyes wide open, keeping our heads down as we head into these storms...........
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starman1





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PostWed May 20, 2009 2:44 pm  Reply with quote  

Although it's not an official season storm, this "hybrid" may warrant keeping an eye on. Heads up down in the south...
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:
Flooding Rain and Rough Surf Affecting Florida

We continue to monitor a large area of disturbed weather covering the northern Bahamas and Florida northward to the Georgia coast. An upper-level storm has formed near 27 north, 84 west or about 130 miles due east of Fort Myers, Fla. A surface low is located near Naples, Fla. The upper level and surface system will slowly move west-northwest over the next 24 hours. The cyclonic flow around both features will help bring rain and thunderstorms to Florida and the northern Bahamas. Rain will extend into southern and southeastern Georgia and along the southern South Carolina coast through Wednesday night. Some of this rain will be heavy and some places could experience flooding.

The surface storm is under the influence of the cold air aloft caused by the upper-level system. As a result this is not a tropical system. The surface storm will continue to draw tropical moisture northward into Florida. So the lower part of this storm will be somewhat tropical and the upper level will be cold. This hybrid storm system will generate conditions over South and southeastern Florida similar to that of a tropical system. This will include heavy rainfall than 39 mph. But the strongest winds through Wednesday night will be felt along the upper Florida Coast where a pressure difference with high pressure to the north will be strongest. This will be far removed from where the surface low will be located. This again fits the description of a non-tropical or perhaps hybrid type storm system.

Global computer models continue to project this system northwest toward the upper Gulf coast on Thursday and Friday. This means the wind and the rain will spread westward across the deep southern United States tomorrow through Friday. As stated before, regardless of the exact classification, this system will bring Florida and eventually Gulf coast areas moderate to heavy rainfall that could lead to localized flooding due to quick downpours. Strong winds created by high pressure to the north and the surface storm will bring wind gusts over 40 mph along Florida's east coast northward to the southern coast of South Carolina. This will lead to very rough and dangerous surf and beach erosion through Thursday.

By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski

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starman1





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Posts: 1583
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PostFri May 29, 2009 2:32 pm  Reply with quote  

The 2009 Season has officially begun with a tropical depression cruising along the Atlantic Seaboard. Experts do not expect it to develop into the first named storm of the season, as they suspect it is headed toward "unfavorable conditions".
Keeping the watch...

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=atlantic

quote:

Tropical Depression One Moving Out

We have the first tropical depression of the 2009 season. It is the low pressure area that AccuWeather.com meteorologists have been tracking along the Atlantic Seaboard the past few days.

The circulation of this relatively small system is well defined on satellite imagery. It is now unlikely that the depression will become the first named Atlantic tropical storm as it continues to head toward unfavorable conditions for development (cooler water). Tropical Depression One is moving to the east-northeast at 16 mph with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph. As of 5:00 a.m., EDT, Friday, Depression One was located at 38.9 north and 66.3 west or 425 miles east of New York City.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Basin, there are no organized tropical systems and/or tropical waves, and none are expected to develop over the next 24-48 hours. This is due to a very strong wind shear over a good portion of the Atlantic Basin.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Matthew Rinde

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starman1





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PostFri Jun 19, 2009 2:27 pm  Reply with quote  

It looks like the season has now officially arrived on the Pacific side, down near the west Mexican coastline. There is an impressive Tropical Depression qualifying as the season's first out in the East Pacific that appears to be targeting the Mexican coast to the southeast of Baja. Experts are warning it may become a Tropical Storm and if it does it will earn the name "Andres", which would make it this season's first named system. This system is predicted to deliver heavy amounts of rain into parts of the Mexican Mainland and potentially to New Mexico and maybe Texas...
Keeping an eye on what ever develops, heads up down in Mexico.........
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Depression Continues Moving toward Mexican Coast

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR LAS ISLES MARIAS.

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS IN EFFECT FOR THE PACIFIC COAST OF MAINLAND MEXICO FROM TOPOLOBAMPO SOUTHWARD TO CABO CORRIENTES.

At 8 a.m. EDT Friday, the center of near 20.1 north and 107.0 west, or about 215 miles south-southwest of Mazatlan, Mexico. The depression is moving to the north-northeast at 12 mph, with maximum sustained winds near 35 mph and higher gusts.

The depression is encountering southwesterly upper-level shear due to its proximity to an upper-level trough over the Baja. Therefore, we do not expect any rapid strengthening, but it could reach tropical storm status over the next 12-24 hours. The upper-level trough will also help to steer this feature to the north and east, bringing the storm near Las Islas Marias Friday night and close to the coast of Mexico Saturday. If it becomes a tropical storm, it would be called Andres. Moisture from this feature has already extended as far north as the southern Rockies, and there could be locally heavy flooding rain produced from southwestern and western Mexico northward into New Mexico and western Texas over the next couple of days. The heaviest rainfall is expected across western Mexico, where 4-8 inches is possible through the weekend, with locally higher amounts in the mountains.

Another tropical wave located along 98 west, north of 10 north, continues to produce showers and thunderstorms as it moves westward across the Eastern Pacific. Development is not likely over the next 24 hours; however, this wave will need to be monitored for future development this weekend.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Jun 20, 2009 2:39 pm  Reply with quote  

Saturday morning 7:00 am sharp PST, looking at the satellite imagery this morning confirms nothing in this next expert report and undermines everything stated in their last. The Depression 1-E has already cleared Mexico and is moving over southwest Texas. And this quote comes from the last report posted yesterday... "bringing the storm near Las Islas Marias Friday night and close to the coast of Mexico Saturday"... What a job, you never have to be right and you still get a paycheck...






http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:

Depression Near the Mexican Coast

The remnants of 1-E will spread northward through northwestern Mexico through Saturday, causing thunderstorms with locally heavy downpours. Tropical downpours will spread through West Texas during the day on Saturday. Moisture from the depression will spread northward through the Plains states on Saturday night.

A tropical wave is along 97 west, north of 16 north, creeping very slowly to the west. It appears that a circulation is starting to form near 16 north, 97 west, which is just south of the Mexican coastline, not far south of Puerto Angel. There is some potential for this feature to organize further over the weekend and will require close watch.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Frank Strait and Mark Paquette




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starman1





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PostMon Jun 22, 2009 3:07 pm  Reply with quote  

Asleep at the wheel over the Father's Day celebration enjoying the company of family when the season's first named storm geared up in the Eastern Pacific waters off the coast of Mexico.
What is now officially wearing the name, Tropical Storm "Andres" is cruising the southwestern Mexican Coastline maintaining wind speeds of over 50 mph, and delivering heavy amounts of rain as it heads northwesterly up the coast line.
Back on the watch... Eyes wide open.........

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storm Andres Moving Slowly

As of 5 a.m. PDT Monday, Tropical Storm Andres and was located near 15.2 north and 102.0 west, or about 180 miles south of Zihuatanejo, Mexico, moving slowly to the northwest at 3 mph. Maximum sustained winds were 50 mph with higher gusts. The storm is expected to continue moving northwestward during the next day or two, remaining close to the coast of Mexico. Locally heavy rain will fall on portions of the southern and southwestern coasts of Mexico for the next 48 hours or so, and combine with a rough surf.

Due to its strength and proximity to the coast, there is a tropical storm watch is in effect from Zihuatanejo northward to Manzanillo.

A weak area of low pressure is centered about 1,300 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. While it remains disorganized, the area of low pressure continues to produce numerous showers and thunderstorms. Weather conditions in the area remain unfavorable for any rapid strengthening.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer

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starman1





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PostTue Jun 23, 2009 2:40 pm  Reply with quote  

It appears that this years first named storm on the Pacific side will also become this years first HURRICANE!!!
Tropical Storm "Andres" is hovering at about 70 mph, which is just short of the required 75 mph needed to qualify it as an official hurricane, as it is cruising up the Mexican coastline. Experts do expect it to gain strength "slowly" today and reach hurricane strength. Here is their report...


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Andres Continues to Bring Gusty Winds, Heavy Rain to Mexico

As of 5 a.m. PDT Monday, Tropical Storm Andres and was located near 17.7 north and 103.9 west, or about 110 miles south-southeast of Manzanillo, Mexico. Andres is moving to the northwest at 9 mph, and this general motion is expected to continue today. Maximum sustained winds are 70 mph with higher gusts. The storm is expected to track very close to the southwestern coast of Mexico as it slowly strengthens, and Andres is expected to become a hurricane later today. Heavy rainfall will be the greatest impact from Andres in places like Manzanillo, Puerto Vallarta and Guadalajara with the potential for flooding and mudslides across the region. Localized strong winds could cause minor damage, especially along the coast today into tonight. Rough surf and rip currents will be a problem along the entire coast of western Mexico right through the week.

Due to its proximity to the coast and potential for strengthening, hurricane warnings remain in effect from Punto San Telmo to Cabo Corrientes in southwestern Mexico. Tropical storm warnings and a hurricane watch are in effect from Lazaro Cardenas to Punto San Telmo.

Another weak area of low pressure is located well to the southwest of Baja California in the open waters of the Pacific and development of this system is not expected during the next 48 hours.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer


And here is the latest image...
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starman1





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PostWed Jun 24, 2009 12:04 am  Reply with quote  

Its official, the season's first named storm in the East Pacific has reached and is maintaining hurricane strength along the southwestern coast of Mexico. "Hurricane Andres" is holding firm with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph, and is moving northward along Mexico's coastline.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Andres Remains a Hurricane

Andres strengthened into a hurricane Tuesday afternoon and remains one as of Tuesday evening. As of 5 p.m. PDT Tuesday, Hurricane Andres was located near 19.0 north and 105.6 west, or about 70 miles west-southwest of Manzanillo, Mexico. Andres is moving to the northwest at 13 mph, and this general motion is expected to continue through Tuesday night. Maximum sustained winds are 75 mph with higher gusts. The storm is expected to track very close to the southwestern coast of Mexico overnight and then begin to peel away from the southwestern Mexican coast Wednesday morning. Heavy rainfall will be the greatest impact from Andres in places like Manzanillo, Puerto Vallarta and Guadalajara with potential for flooding and mudslides across the region. Localized strong winds could cause minor damage, especially along the coast into Tuesday night. Rough surf and rip currents will be a problem along the entire coast of western Mexico right through the week. Andres should weaken over cooler waters later Wednesday and Wednesday night.

Hurricane warnings remain in effect from Punto San Telmo to Cabo Corrientes in southwestern Mexico.

Another weak area of low pressure is located well to the southwest of Baja California in the open waters of the Pacific, and development of this system is not expected during the next 48 hours.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Bob Smerbeck



This picture of the hurricane has a smiling face where the "EYE" should be.........
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starman1





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PostWed Jun 24, 2009 1:31 pm  Reply with quote  

"Andres" is no longer running at hurricane speed and is once again classified as a Tropical Storm, which should pose no further threat to land (as a hurricane) other than areas of heavy rainfall and some potential flooding and mudslides, (still dangerous non the less) if it behaves as predicted by the experts.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Andres Continues to Weaken

Andres briefly strengthened into a hurricane on Tuesday afternoon into Tuesday evening before encountering more unfavorable conditions and weakening back to a tropical storm. Satellite images as of Wednesday morning show that Andres is becoming very ragged in appearance and has little if any banding features. As of 5 a.m. PDT Wednesday, Tropical Storm Andres was located near 20.0 north and 108.0 west, or about 75 miles southwest of Cabo Corrientes, Mexico. Andres is moving to the northwest at 10 mph and this general motion is expected to continue through tonight, with a gradual turn to the west-northwest and decrease in forward speed. Maximum-sustained winds remain near 60 mph with higher gusts.

Andres is expected to continue to parallel the Mexican coastline this afternoon before making a gradual left-hand turn. This will push the system to the south of the southernmost tip Baja California late tonight, before moving into the open Pacific water on Thursday night and Friday. Moderate to heavy rainfall will continue to be a threat from Manzanillo to Puerto Vallarta and Guadalajara with the threat of flooding and mudslides continuing across the region. Rough surf and rip currents will continue to be an issue through the remainder of the week as the system pushes away. However, the wind threat has quickly diminished as the system weakens and pushes well west of the area.

Tropical storm warnings have been discontinued from Manzanillo to Cabo Corrientes, Mexico.

One other weak area of low pressure is located well to the southwest of Baja California in the open waters of the Pacific. Though some showers and thunderstorms are associated with this system, no development is expected the next couple of days.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Justin Povick

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starman1





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PostThu Jun 25, 2009 1:58 pm  Reply with quote  

One done, "Andres" has passed away into recorded history...
All is quiet for now on both fronts/coast.........


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Andres Dissipated; Quiet Across Eastern Pacific

Andres dissipated on Wednesday afternoon. All that is left today is a disorganized remnant low pressure system of light to moderate rain showers southeast of the Baja Peninsula. Due to unfavorable conditions in the area, Andres is not expected to re-strengthen.

Other than the weak shower and thunderstorm activity along the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the Eastern Pacific Basin is back to a quiet pattern.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Brian Wimer

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starman1





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PostThu Jul 02, 2009 1:49 pm  Reply with quote  

Shhhhhhhhhhh,
all quiet on both horizons for now...
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starman1





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PostMon Jul 06, 2009 1:46 pm  Reply with quote  

The season's second named storm is brewing out in the East Pacific waters southwest of Baja this morning. At number 2 for the season on this side its "Blanca", who at this point is not expected to make any impact on any land masses before it dissipates in the Pacific, and as yet is no where near hurricane strength.
We will be keeping the watch on it none the less.........

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storm Blanca Forms Southwest of Mexico

An area of thunderstorms about 420 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California has developed into Tropical Storm Blanca this morning. Blanca is the second tropical storm of the 2009 Eastern Pacific season and is located at 17.1 north and 111.8 west as of 5:30 a.m. PDT. Blanca has maximum sustained winds of 40 mph with gusts to 50 mph. The storm is moving to the west-northwest at 9 mph, and this motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days. This will take the storm away from land areas. Water temperatures are warm enough near the storm that some strengthening will probably occur during the next 24 hours. After that, Blanca will likely move over cooler waters which will lead to weakening.

Elsewhere, tropical waves are located along and near 84 west and along and near 101 west mostly south of 15 north. The waves are moving west at near 8 degrees longitude per day which is slightly faster than normal. We see no low-level or midlevel cyclonic features associated with either tropical wave at this time. As a result, further organization is not expected for at least the next couple of days.
By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer
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starman1





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PostTue Jul 07, 2009 2:22 pm  Reply with quote  

"Blanca" is still cruising along as a Tropical Storm, but she is moving out to sea away from land where she/it is expected to eventually dissipate...
Still watching.....

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Tropical Storm Blanca Moving Away From Land

Tropical Storm Blanca formed on Monday morning well south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Blanca is the second tropical storm of the 2009 Eastern Pacific season and as of 2 a.m. PDT, was located at 18.5 north and 114.5 west. This is about 425 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Maximum-sustained winds are near 50 mph with gusts to 60 mph. The storm is moving to the west-northwest at 9 mph, and this motion is expected to continue for the next couple of days.

An upper-level high pressure area located north-northwest of the storm will steer the storm on a northwest to westerly track over the course of the next couple of days. This will steer the storm well away from any land areas. The storm has not intensified overnight and is unlikely to do so during the day today. The track of the storm will take it over cooler waters later today and this will probably cause Blanca to start weakening tonight and on Wednesday.

Elsewhere, tropical waves are located along and near 90 west and along and near 109 west, mostly south of 15 north. The waves are moving west at near 8 degrees longitude per day which is slightly faster than normal. We see no low-level or midlevel cyclonic features associated with either tropical wave at this time. As a result, further organization is not expected for at least the next couple of days.
By AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer
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starman1





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PostWed Jul 08, 2009 2:03 pm  Reply with quote  

No longer qualifying as a Tropical Storm, the Pacific season's #2 "Blanca" has winded down to a Tropical Depression and appears to be fading away quite nicely with no further development to be expected out of this one, as per the experts reports...



http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:
Blanca Continues to Weaken

Blanca, once a tropical storm, is now a tropical depression. As of 2 a.m. PDT, Blanca was located at 20.8 north and 119.0 west. This is about 600 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Maximum-sustained winds are near 35 mph with higher gusts. The depression is moving to the west-northwest near 14 mph.

Blanca is moving over cooler ocean water, and this is causing the depression to weaken gradually. High pressure to the north continues to steer the weakening tropical storm into this cooler water. Blanca should become a remnant low later today or early on Thursday.

Elsewhere, a tropical wave located along 84 west extends from the Caribbean Sea southward across western Panama into the far eastern Pacific. While thunderstorms continue to accompany this wave, there are no signs of a lower-level or midlevel feature, so we expect no further organization for at least the next couple of days. Another tropical wave near 105 west is moving into the shearing inflow on the far south-southeast part of Blanca with clusters of thunderstorms. This activity is being enhanced by upper-air venting to the east of an upper-level low just southwest of Blanca. This area will have to be watched for possible tropical development during the next few days as Blanca and its circulation falls apart.
By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Dan Kottlowski and Meteorologist Mike Pigott

The Atlantic region is still remaining relatively quiet for now, showing no signs of remarkable immediate development of systems.
Staying on the watch.........
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starman1





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PostSat Jul 11, 2009 2:05 pm  Reply with quote  

Number 3 out in the East Pacific region has earned its name and looks like it will become a hurricane soon, for now Tropical Storm "Carlos" isn't a threat to any specific land areas but we will keep an eye on it anyway. It is already gusting winds over 75 mph which is very close to hurricane strength now.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/basin-story.asp?partner=accuweather&traveler=0&basin=epacific

quote:

Tropical Storm Carlos Strengthens

As of 2 a.m. PDT, Tropical Storm Carlos was near 10.5 north and 116.3 west, or about 955 miles south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Maximum-sustained winds were near 65 mph with maximum wind gusts of 75 mph. Carlos motion through the weekend. The upper-level winds steering the system are being controlled by a large high pressure area across the eastern Pacific. These steering winds will guide Carlos westward and keep the system over warm, 80 degrees Fahrenheit and warmer, water and low shear for the next few days. Computer forecasts show Carlos should intensify into a hurricane late on Sunday or early next week. Fortunately, Carlos will stay well away from land.

A weak tropical wave along 100 west, north of 5 north near the Mexican coast, is moving westward at about 4-5 degrees longitude per day. Large thunderstorm clusters are forming on either side of this tropical wave and this will have to be watched closely. If this system moves too far west it will become sheared by Tropical Storm Carlos. Elsewhere in the Eastern Pacific Basin, no tropical development is expected through Sunday.

By AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Michael LeSeney

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