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Global warming bill to cost Americans 2.4 million jobs and

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visual ray wizard





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Global warming bill to cost Americans 2.4 million jobs and PostMon Aug 17, 2009 12:19 am  Reply with quote  

$1250.00 per household if passed. Keeping in mind that the sun is the primary driver of global warming or global cooling does it make sense to step off the proverbial global warming cliff at this time? You guys know the earth-space thing is one of my areas of special interest......

http://www.bizjournals.com/phoenix/stories/2009/08/10/daily45.html?ana=from_rss

A carbon emissions plan under consideration in Washington aimed at global warming and climate change could cost the U.S. economy between 1.8 million and 2.4 million jobs over the next two decades.

The study, released Wednesday by the National Association of Manufacturers and the American Council for Capital Formation, worries about plans of Democrats and the Obama administration plans that would put caps and fees on carbon emissions and pollution.

The business study says the climate bill would increase costs that would be passed onto consumers and that a U.S. household would lose as much as $250 annually by 2020 and $1,250 by 2030. Also, according to the study, the GDP could lose 2.4 percent of its value by 2030.

Environmental groups discounted the business study’s conclusions, saying the climate and energy plans will bolster alternative energy development and production, reduce carbon emissions and pollution and reduce U.S. reliance on fossil fuels and foreign oil.

comment

You folks realize that the last 40+ years of reducing sulfides in the northern hemisphere has CONTRIBUTED to ARTIC MELTING not slowed it down due to more solar energy reaching the earth's surface. HOW IRONIC!

Antartic regions in the south (less industrialized) are seeing a profound expansion of ice levels in part due to an extended solar minimum that has set a century mark for inactivity.

Of course any scientist who points this out against the globalist agenda faces immediate censorship and risks losing their funding and certain black ball consequences.

So Asia will not participate in this global effort yet they are emitting more pollution than ever before with hardly any environmental considerations what so ever. They are allowed to hoard the earth's wealth, breed uncontrollably and at the same time destroy our environment with no consequences what so ever. If that is your idea of a "new world order" you can take it and shove it where the sun don't shine as far as I am concerned......
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visual ray wizard





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Earth wobble major contributor to global warming PostMon Aug 17, 2009 2:25 am  Reply with quote  

http://refreshingnews9.blogspot.com/2009/08/wobbling-earth-triggers-climate-change.html


Regular wobbles in the earth's tilt were responsible for the global warming episodes that interspersed prehistoric ice ages, according to new evidence.

The finding is the result of research led by Dr Russell Drysdale of the University of Newcastle that has been able to accurately date the end of the penultimate ice age for the first time.

The new dates, which appear in the today's edition of Science, show the end of the second last ice age occurring 141,000 years ago, thousands of years earlier than previously thought.

Using information gathered from a trio of Italian stalagmites, the research has punched a hole in the prevailing theory that interglacial periods are related to changes in the intensity of the northern hemisphere summer.

Drysdale and colleagues suggest that the earth emerges from ice ages due in large part to changes in the tilt of the planet in relation to the sun, otherwise known as its obliquity. This affects the total amount of sunlight each hemisphere receives in its respective summer, rather than the peak intensity of the solar radiation during the northern summer.
Dating ice ages

Sediment on the sea floor contains accurate a record of what happened to the earth's climate prior to the last ice age. But up until now dating the sediment and the evident climatic changes has not been possible.

Drysdale and colleagues overcome this difficulty by comparing the changes in the sea floor to similar material on the surface that can be accurately dated.

Dr John Hellstrom of the University of Melbourne used a very sensitive mass spectrometer to measure the amount of uranium and thorium contained in samples taken from the three stalagmites in the Italian Antro del Corchia cave to date the material.

They were then able to relate variations in the chemical composition of the stalagmites, to changes in the North Atlantic sea floor, thereby dating the changes.

"When it's cold in the ocean, there is less evaporation and less rainfall above the cave. When it's warm in the ocean, there's a lot more water evaporated and a lot more rain," says Hellstrom.
Then and now

This technique for dating the comings and goings of prehistoric ice sheets has the potential for tracking climate changes much further back than ever before.

The result is that the new date for the end of the second last ice age is thousands of years too early to be related to any increase in the intensity of the northern hemisphere summer as predicted by the Milankovitch Theory.

Instead, the researchers found that, in the past million years global warming events have occurred every second or third cycle of the earth's changing obliquity, which occurs every 41,000 years.

Hellstrom says that the new knowledge may assist in calibrating the effectiveness of current climate modelling technology.

"Any improvement we can have in understanding how the earth's orbital parameters affect our coming in and out of ice ages can certainly affect the models used now too."


comment

Louisville Kentucky just experienced it's first ever July free of temperatures reaching 90 degrees, our fields are lush and green and farmers are enjoying an exceptional hay crop this year. FYI

Footnote we did how ever experience a rain event on August 4, 2009 that shattered the record books. I witnessed 6 inches of rain fall in one hour with a total of close to 8 inches in less than 3. Our average rainfall for the total month is a little over 3.5 inches so needless to say we did experience devasting flooding in localized areas.
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visual ray wizard





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GLOBAL COOLING HITS AL GORE'S HOME TOWN OF NASHVILLE TENN. PostWed Aug 19, 2009 1:41 am  Reply with quote  

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/christopherbooker/5907383/Global-cooling-hits-Al-Gores-home.html



It was delightfully appropriate that, as large parts of Argentina were swept by severe blizzards last week, on a scale never experienced before, the city of Nashville, Tennessee, should have enjoyed the coolest July 21 in its history, breaking a record established in 1877. Appropriate, because Nashville is the home of Al Gore, the man who for 20 years has been predicting that we should all by now be in the grip of runaway global warming.

His predictions have proved so wildly wrong – along with those of the Met Office's £33 million computer model which forecast that we should now be enjoying a "barbecue summer" and that 2009 would be one of "the five warmest years ever" – that the propaganda machine has had to work overtime to maintain what is threatening to become the most expensive fiction in history.


Related Articles
Secret vote keeps EU whistleblower from office The two official sources of satellite data on global temperatures, for instance, lately announced that June temperatures had again fallen, to their average level for the month over the 30 years since satellite data began. By contrast, the Goddard Institute for Space Studies, run by Mr Gore's closest ally and scientific adviser, James Hansen – one of the two official sources of global temperature data from surface weather stations – announced that in that single month the world had warmed by a staggering 0.63 degrees C, more than its net warming for the entire 20th century.

In the past few years, Dr Hansen's temperature record has become ever more eccentric, often wildly at odds with the other three officially recognised data sources, all of which showed a dramatic drop in temperatures in 2007 leading to markedly cooler summers and two of the coldest and snowiest winters the world has known for decades. All this has equally made nonsense of the predictions of the computer models that the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change relies on, which are programmed to assume that temperatures should soar in line with rising levels of greenhouse gases.

Carbon dioxide levels continue to rise, but temperatures – apart from those revealed by Dr Hansen – have seriously parted company with them. This has not prevented the propaganda machine's media groupies continuing to peddle a daily stream of stories about how in all directions global warming is already affecting the world for the worse.

Soay sheep are shrinking in size (I am sure they've really noticed the global warming up on that bleak Scottish islet). The tiny Pacific nation of Tuvalu, we are yet again told, is pleading for international aid, as it sinks below the rising ocean – even though an expert study in 2001 showed that sea levels around Tuvalu have in fact been falling for 50 years. Even a report on the record number of Painted Lady butterflies in Britain this summer cannot resist ending with a ritual forecast that many butterfly species will soon disappear because of "climate change".

Meanwhile even America's foremost pro-warmist scientific blog, RealClimate – run by, among others, Dr Michael Mann of "hockey stick" fame – concedes that global temperatures are not only declining but are likely to continue to do so for at least another decade – after which, of course, they will leap up again higher than ever.
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Gort519





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PostSun Aug 23, 2009 1:57 pm  Reply with quote  

Maybe instead of calling it global warming, they should call it global pollution. It's not about the temperature of the earth, it's about how much pollution the human population is contributing to it.

Emissions from coal-burning plants, factories, car/truck/jet emissions, etc. are a major concern. We could use the time and energy to take care of that situation and stop arguing about the temperature.

Edit: Since the beginning of the 20th century the air, ground, water, and oceans have been polluted with vast quantities of toxic materials - and that's probably just the tip of the iceberg as they say. So that's over 100 years of all that - humans have altered the earth in incalculable ways. And it continues. So what's the "tipping point?" Have we passed it? Are we just all lucky to still be around?

The day that I realized that I was born into a world that had witnessed two atomic bombs - that was pretty much it for me thinking that we as humans would be around for a whole lot longer...
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Gort519





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PostFri Aug 28, 2009 10:04 pm  Reply with quote  

Bumping for edit.
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visual ray wizard





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Are we entering a new mini ice age? PostSun Aug 30, 2009 1:15 am  Reply with quote  

The lingering cool temperatures being experience by much of North America has weather forecasters wondering it we are entering a new Little Ice Age—a reference to the prolonged period of cold weather that afflicted the world for centuries and didn't end until just prior to the American Civil War. From historical records, scientists have found a strong correlation between low sunspot activity and a cooling climate. At the end of May, an international panel of experts led by NOAA and sponsored by NASA released a new prediction for the next solar cycle: Solar Cycle 24 will be one of the weakest in recent memory. Are we about to start a new Little Ice Age?

According to the report, Solar Cycle 24 will peak in May 2013 with a sunspot count well below average. “If our prediction is correct, Solar Cycle 24 will have a peak sunspot number of 90, the lowest of any cycle since 1928 when Solar Cycle 16 peaked at 78,” says panel chairman Doug Biesecker of the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center. This does not mean that we won't feel the results of renewed solar storm activity here on Earth.

“Even a below-average cycle is capable of producing severe space weather,” points out Biesecker. “The great geomagnetic storm of 1859, for instance, occurred during a solar cycle of about the same size we’re predicting for 2013.” A recent report by the National Academy of Sciences found that if a storm similar to the 1859 disturbance—known as the “Carrington Event” after astronomer Richard Carrington who observed the associated solar flare—occurred today, it could cause $1 to 2 trillion in damages to society's high-tech infrastructure and require four to ten years for complete recovery. Reportedly, the 1859 storm electrified transmission cables, set fires in telegraph offices, and produced Northern Lights so bright that people could read newspapers by their glow.




In 1991, a pair of Danish meteorologists published a paper in which they pointed out a remarkably strong correlation between the length of the solar activity cycle and the global mean temperature in the northern hemisphere. Not all activity cycles are the same length, with longer cycles of 12-14 years duration seeming to indicate cooler global temperatures than shorter 9-10 year cycles. It is difficult to assess the effect of recent solar cycles on global climate, let alone those from the Maunder minimum, because of the relatively short time span for which detailed observations exist. Climate data for the past 100 years are spotty enough, climate records become sparse to nonexistent when looking back more than a century.

The correlation between temperature and sunspot activity has been commented on before on this site (see “Scientists Discover The Sun Does Affect Earth's Climate”), so I will not go into great detail about it here. However, it is interesting to note that a comparison of sea surface temperature and the number of observed sunspots over the past 150 years or so yeilds an astoundingly close match—much closer than the correlation between CO2 and temperature.


Despite claims by global warming activists that rising temperatures are extending growing seasons around the world, the opposite seems to be happening this year. Cool weather has pushed growth of Western Canada's wheat and barley crop at least 10 days behind schedule, according to the Canadian Wheat Board. “You're pushing development into a period with better likelihood of getting a frost,” said Bruce Burnett, director of weather and market analysis for the Canadian Wheat Board. “It's not particularly what we need at this moment. It's just too cool.”

Proving that this isn't only a Northern Hemisphere phenomenon, Brazil may cut this year’s corn output forecast for a third consecutive time, as a frost in several states caused more crop damage. According to Silvio Porto, agriculture policy director, corn growers may harvest less than the 49.9 million metric tons forecast previously announced as frost struck Parana and Mato Grosso do Sul states in the past two weeks. “It’s a worrying situation as corn has already suffered with a severe drought,” Porto said. “Still, it’s too early to know the size of the damage.”

New record cold temperatures have been seen in a number of locations around the world, marking this as one of the coldest springs in years. With reports of late season frost and snow falls, some are already forecasting a very cool summer. Not trying to sound alarmist or start any rumors but scientists' best conjecture regarding the conditions that signal the start of a new glacial period are cool, cloudy summers. Is this the beginning of Little Ice Age II, the sequel? If so, we will look back fondly on the time we were all so concerned about global warming. Remember, in the words of SF author Orson Scott Card, “'global warming' is just another term for 'good weather.'”
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Warming in Asia unexpectedly causes Himilayan glaciers to PostSun Aug 30, 2009 1:35 am  Reply with quote  

grow significantly.

That’s why a collection of glaciers in the Southeast Himalayas stymies those who know what they did 9,000 years ago. While most other Central Asian glaciers retreated under hotter summer temperatures, this group of glaciers advanced from one to six kilometers.

A new study by BYU geologist Summer Rupper pieces together the chain of events surrounding the unexpected glacial growth.

“Stronger monsoons were thought to be responsible,” said Rupper, who reports her findings in the September issue of the journal Quaternary Research. “Our research indicates the extra snowfall from monsoonal effects can only take credit for up to 30 percent of the glacial advance.”

As Central Asia’s summer climate warmed as much as 6 degrees Celsius, shifting weather patterns brought more clouds to the Southeast Himalayas. The additional shade created a pocket of cooler temperatures.

Temperatures also dropped when higher winds spurred more evaporation in this typically humid area, the same process behind household swamp coolers.

The story of these seemingly anomalous glaciers underscores the important distinction between the terms “climate change” and “global warming.”

“Even when average temperatures are clearly rising regionally or globally, what happens in any given location depends on the exact dynamics of that place,” Rupper said.

The findings come from a framework Rupper developed as an alternative to the notion that glaciers form and melt in direct proportion to temperature. Her method is based on the balance of energy between a glacier and a wide range of climate factors, including wind, humidity, precipitation, evaporation and cloudiness.

Gerard Roe and Alan Gillespie of the University of Washington are co-authors of the new study.

Knowing how glaciers responded in past periods of climate change will help Rupper forecast the region’s water supply in the coming decades. She and collaborators are in the process of determining how much of the Indus River comes from the vast network of glaciers far upstream from the agricultural valleys of India and Pakistan.

“Their study can be used to help assess future glaciological and hydrological changes in the most populated part of our planet, which is a region that is now beginning to experience the profound effects of human-induced climate change,” said Lewis Owen, a geologist at the University of Cincinnati who was not affiliated with this study.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/08/090827101207.htm
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El Nina and La Nina have huge effects on the amount of CO2 PostSun Aug 30, 2009 1:58 am  Reply with quote  

that is trapped by earth's oceans.

The computer model showed that during El Niño periods, warm waters from the Western Pacific Ocean spread out over much of the ocean basin as upwelling weakens in the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Upwelling brings cool, nutrient-rich water from the deep ocean up to the surface. When the upwelling is weakened, there are less phytoplankton, making food more scarce for zooplankton that eat the ocean plants.

During La Niña conditions as in 1998, the opposite effect occurs as the easterly trade winds pick up and upwelling intensifies bringing nutrients like iron to the surface waters, which increases phytoplankton growth. Sometimes, the growth can take place quickly, developing into what scientists call phytoplankton "blooms."

In a study published in the January 2005 issue of Geophysical Research Letters, Wendy Wang and colleagues at the University of Maryland Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, College Park, Md., found that changes in phytoplankton amounts due to El Niño and La Niña not only affect the food chain, but also influence Earth's climate.

As phytoplankton flourish during La Niña years, a large amount of carbon is used to build their cells during photosynthesis. The plants get carbon from carbon dioxide in surface waters. In the atmosphere, carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas. When marine organisms die, they carry carbon in their cells to the deep ocean. Surprisingly, this study found that this transfer of carbon to the deep ocean increased by a factor of eight due to the large phytoplankton blooms that can occur during a La Niña. At the same time, the effects of El Niños can reduce phytoplankton numbers, and decrease the impacts of this "biological carbon pump."

Using a computer model and NASA's Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) satellite, Wang examined marine biological changes associated with El Niño and La Niña, and found the mechanisms responsible for such phytoplankton blooms. SeaWiFS measures the amount of light coming out of the ocean at different wavelengths on the spectrum, and can determine the strength of the greenness coming from the tiny plants' cells.

When the El Niño of 1997-1998 became a La Niña beginning in mid-1998, SeaWiFS imagery showed extremely dark greenness along the equator. "[At that time SeaWifs showed] chlorophyll concentrations increasing by more than 500 percent, a level not previously observed," said Wang. The study found that because most microscopic animals called zooplankton died off during the El Niño there were less around to eat phytoplankton. That led to large phytoplankton blooms.

Besides influencing the marine food web, phytoplankton also help regulate the Earth's climate by accounting for about half of the carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, absorbed annually from the atmosphere by plants.


Did you know that a typical mature tree absorbs almost 800 pounds of pollution annually? What if we had a world earth day in which every person on the planet dedicated themselves to planting a tree or three?
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Oil refiner Valero claims CO2 bill to cost 7 billion YEARLY! PostMon Aug 31, 2009 12:04 am  Reply with quote  

guess who is going to pay for that in the end?

http://www.reuters.com/article/GCA-GreenBusiness/idUSTRE57R4JJ20090828

By Timothy Gardner and Janet McGurty
NEW YORK (Reuters) - The U.S. climate bill would cost Valero, the country's largest oil refiner, more annually than it has ever made in a year, forcing it to warn consumers at filling stations that fuel prices will rise, the company's top government affairs official said.

"How would we be able to operate?" Jim Greenwood, a vice president for governmental affairs at San Antonio based-Valero Energy Corp, said about the legislation the House of Representatives narrowly passed in June. "I don't know."

He said the bill, which would require refiners to hold or purchase permits for the amount of carbon dioxide their plants and fuels produce, would cost Valero some $6 billion to $7 billion per year.

That is more than the net income it made during 2006, its best year of net income for refining so far.

Many oil refiners have complained they would be burdened by extra costs from the bill, which would set up a cap-and-trade market on emissions around 2012. It would give refiners only 2 percent of the permits to emit greenhouse gases in the early years of program, while utilities would get 30 percent of the permits to pollute.

Democratic leaders in the U.S. Senate are expected to introduce their version of the bill next month. It is uncertain whether there would be enough votes to pass it this year.

Greenwood also took issue with the number of refiner permits in the legislation.

But he said Valero preferred a radical reworking of the bill to include far more research-and-development money for technologies such as advanced biofuels and carbon capture and storage underground, rather than a reworking of the bill to include more permits for refiners.

Critics of carbon capture and storage have said burying enough carbon dioxide underground to help slow global warming would require building a pipeline system equal to the size of the current U.S. liquid fuel pipes system.

But Greenwood said Valero sees it as a top priority. "If they can make some breakthroughs ... especially with carbon capture and sequestration, you can halve carbon emissions," Greenwood said. "It seems to me (the government) ought to be spending money on figuring out how to do that."

Valero is letting customers know it believes the bill will boost gasoline prices and is encouraging them to write to lawmakers. The company has printed 100,000 signs with that message and is encouraging franchise owners of its gasoline stations to place them at the top of fuel pumps.

It hopes such opposition could help persuade moderate Senators to vote against the bill, especially in industrial states. Valero has already installed 1,000 of the signs at stations the company owns, mostly in the U.S. Southwest.

"We have to calculate whether we can pass the climate bill costs through to consumers and what the impact is going to be on the demand for gasoline and operationally how we are going to adjust," said Greenwood.

He said a carbon tax would be more transparent than a cap-and-trade market. Even adding an additional gasoline tax of 10 or 20 cents a gallon would be preferable to cap and trade in which the prices for emitting a ton of carbon could be hard to predict, he said.

This year Valero bought seven distilleries to make traditional ethanol from corn and has made other investments in companies that plan to make advanced cellulosic ethanol from nonfood crops and fuel from algae.
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Global warming cynicism rising in face of facts PostWed Sep 16, 2009 4:02 am  Reply with quote  

Global warming cynicism rises in face of stronger evidence

A significant proportion of the population have become more sceptical about climate change and the link with man-made emissions of greenhouse gases despite the fact that the scientific evidence has become stronger.


A survey of public opinion has found that 29 per cent of people believe claims that human activities are changing the climate are exaggerated compared with 15 per cent of respondents to a similar survey carried out in 2003.

By the way here are the updated figures regarding the sun's lack of activity as of today.

Spotless Days
Current Stretch: 14 days
2009 total: 207 days (81%)
Since 2004: 718 days
Typical Solar Min: 485 days
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China and India warned over emissions PostThu Sep 17, 2009 3:04 am  Reply with quote  

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/f67dd2d4-a22a-11de-9caa-00144feabdc0.html?nclick_check=1

By Daniel Dombey in Washington

Published: September 15 2009 23:19 | Last updated: September 15 2009 23:19

Todd Stern, the US’s climate change envoy, has warned countries such as China and India that they run greater risk of protectionist measures in the US Congress if they do not co-operate on international steps to hold down carbon emissions.

Speaking to the FT, he added that the US would still have a solid bargaining position even if, as is widely expected, the Obama administration fails to push its own emissions legislation through Congress before December’s intergovernmental conference at Copenhagen.

EDITOR’S CHOICE
In depth: Climate change - Sep-01US Senate pressed on emissions curbs - Sep-11Offer of deal for climate talks - Sep-10UK scepticism on climate change increases - Sep-11Poor Indian monsoon triggers rice price fears - Sep-09EU sets out €15bn climate aid plan - Sep-09Asked about pressure from US legislators to incorporate protectionist measures into the cap-and-trade bill, which has passed the House of Representatives but not the Senate, Mr Stern, said: “The more there is a sense that the big countries are recalcitrant or unwilling to step up then the greater the pressure in Congress is going to be in that direction.”

But he said that in his view a preferable alternative to “border tax-type measures” would be carbon allowances for US trade-sensitive and energy-intensive businesses to help them avoid incurring bigger costs than their competitors in China and elsewhere.

Mr Stern, the state department negotiator for climate change, argued that it would be a “big help” but not “absolutely crucial” for the Senate to pass the legislation before Copenhagen.

But he added that if the legislation had not been passed before Copenhagen but was still “moving in the sense that it hasn’t fallen apart [then it will be] a situation which I’m sure we will be able to deal with”.

In an apparent attempt to garner greater support from developing countries, Mr Stern sought to depict a deal at Copenhagen as a “sustainable development agreement”, rather than just an accord to cap carbon emissions.

Mr Stern drew attention to what he called the “pretty sizeable” proposal by Gordon Brown, British prime minister, for “adaptation” transfers of $100bn (€68bn, £60bn) a year to poor countries by 2020, while arguing, like Mr Brown, that much of this financing would come from the private sector through emissions trading schemes. But he shrank from endorsing the figure put forward by the prime minister.

Setting out the main elements the US looked for out of Copenhagen, he stressed the importance of commitments by developed countries to cut or curb emssions growth and “robust actions in the mid- term” by big developing countries to produce fewer emissions than would be the case for “business as usual”.
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