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2010 HURRICANE WATCH

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Chemtrail Central > Weather

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSun Sep 19, 2010 4:54 pm  Reply with quote  

Death reports from news media last night stated there were at least five dead in the wake of what was Hurricane "Karl" in Mexican territories... The total number of dead is not yet known.



"Igor" is still maintaining hurricane classification as it targets Bermuda; presently it is being reported to be holding CAT 1 status and is forecast to impact the island in less than 12 hours.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp

quote:

Igor Tracking Toward Bermuda; Julia Weakening
Sep 19, 2010 5:15 AM



As of 5:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday, Igor is a Category 1 storm with maximum-sustained winds of 85 mph. Igor was centered near 28.9 north and 65.3 west, or about 235 miles south of Bermuda, moving to the north-northwest at close to 12 mph. The minimum central pressure is 949millibars, or 28.02 inches. A hurricane warning remains in effect for Bermuda.

Igor continues to track over warm waters with low wind shear. However, fluctuations in its intensity are anticipated due to changes in the storm. Current satellite imagery shows that the eyewall has completely filled in with cloud cover and it appears some of the deep convection has decreased as well. In general, we expect Igor to remain a dangerous hurricane through Sunday night before a gradual weakening trend occurs.

A storm system moving off the New England coast will begin to cause Igor to curve more to the north on Sunday, and then northeast early next week. Tropical storm-force winds have reached Bermuda this morning with hurricane conditions expected on Sunday afternoon and evening. Igor will also produce a dangerous storm surge and significant coastal flooding on Bermuda with large waves likely, especially along the south-facing shores. Rough surf and rip currents from Igor will even affect the East Coast of the United States and continue into early next week.

Meanwhile, Julia continues to weaken but remains a tropical storm as it tracks northward at 16 mph through the open waters of the Atlantic. As of 5:00 a.m. EDT on Sunday, Julia was centered near 33.6 north and 51.8 west, or about 1,420 miles west of the Azores. Julia has maximum-sustained winds of 50 mph, with a minimum central pressure of 995 millibars, or 29.38 inches.

Julia continues to encounter upper-level shear created by outflow from Igor, so we do not expect any additional strengthening. The combination of continuing shear and cooler waters will continue to weaken the system as it takes a more northward and eventually northeastward turn. The anticipated track of Julia will continue to keep the system away from any land masses.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Rob Richards.


What is once again an amazing co-incidence(???) to witness is the uncanny timing of the storm systems which have arose over the continental United States through the duration of the presence of Hurricane "Igor" which "ARE" having a direct effect on the movement and direction or trajectory this hurricane is and has taken.
In the report above, highlighted in red text are the expertís claims of this systems movement off the "New England coast" having a direct effect on "Igors" movement. One can watch the satellite loop below and clearly see that the systems which are forming over the US mid west are moving in the direction or position of Igor itself, and with them the atmospheric currents follow which will indeed push "Igor" away from our coast. This pattern has not let up since the inception of this hurricane, and the exact same pattern has been witnessed over the course of the last five hurricane seasons with multiple hurricanes, achieving the same effects on those systems. (can anybody say tornadoes and mega-burst in New York)
Let he/she who has an "eye" see for them.........
Still watching!!!



http://weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_ir_hem.html










http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc_pages/tc_home.html
http://weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_ir_hem.html
http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/data/geo/index.php?satellite=east&channel=vis&coverage=fd&file=gif&imgoranim=img&anim_method=flash
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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon Sep 20, 2010 3:13 pm  Reply with quote  

After taking near dead aim on the island of Bermuda yesterday, Hurricane "Igor" is moving away headed north still holding a CAT 1 classification but is forecast to dissipate soon...

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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue Sep 21, 2010 2:15 pm  Reply with quote  

"Igor" is still being classified as a hurricane maintaining CAT 1 status as it heads north at near 45 mph with most of its energy now passing over Newfoundland.

Still, nearer to the African coast is the seasons 12th named system "Lisa", presently just a tropical storm but it is also predicted to become a hurricane most likely by tomorrow afternoon. This system currently is not expected to become a threat as it faces unfavorable conditions in its path, but it is too early to say for sure what it will do. Present Navy track maps are limiting projection to the central Atlantic but anticipate a northerly westward motion.

Out in the East Pacific the 7th named storm of that regions season has formed as well and has been named Tropical Storm "Georgette". It is forecast to move north along Baja then up into northwest Mexico. At this point there has been no report of any anticipated hurricane formation for this storm system, but reported storm warnings have been issued just the same.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
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starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed Sep 22, 2010 2:19 pm  Reply with quote  

Aside from "Georgette" in the East Pacific region moving north between Baja And Mexico maintaining tropical storm classification, and "Lisa" way off in the East Atlantic not presenting any eminent threats at this point things are relatively mild for the moment.
There is apparently a low beginning to form in the Eastern Caribbean waters and expertís state if a system develops it will head toward Central America, still too early to call this one as well so we watch.....

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather
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starman1





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PostThu Sep 23, 2010 2:21 pm  Reply with quote  

All is calm for the moment, as even "Lisa" is now rated a tropical depression out in the East Atlantic facing unfavorable conditions for strong development in the near future...
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starman1





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PostFri Sep 24, 2010 2:04 pm  Reply with quote  

Another new system has qualified to officially receive a name, at number 13 for the season "Matthew" is presently a tropical storm that formed in the eastern Caribbean and is slated to impact areas of Central America, primarily over areas of Nicaragua and Honduras before moving its way up the Yucatan where it is forecast to dissipate after dumping potentially flooding rains over the peninsula.





"Lisa" remains well out in the Atlantic and presently appears to be no eminent threat...







http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
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starman1





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PostSat Sep 25, 2010 2:13 pm  Reply with quote  

"Lisa" has achieved hurricane status and is presently being clocked as a CAT 1 system. Still well out in the Atlantic this system is not expected to become a threat to any land areas as it continues.
"Matthew" has run aground and is delivering flooding rains and dangerous winds which may be creating life threatening conditions to areas of Central America. Experts forecast this system "will probably stall and rain-out over the southern Yucatan Peninsula or northern Guatemala on Sunday night into Monday.Ē
Warnings of yet another potential system forming in the Caribbean are being reported from computer models which may affect Cuba and possibly Florida in the near future... Heads up down south.....

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
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starman1





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PostThu Sep 30, 2010 1:26 pm  Reply with quote  

The latest system to be given a name for the season has come and nearly gone, and as early as yesterday morning it was still unnamed but sometime over the last 24 hours it officially qualified to be called Tropical Rainstorm "Nicole", at number 14 for the season this system is not expected to become a hurricane, as it is being pulled rapidly north, but according to expert reports it will still wreak havoc on the east coast spawning thunderstorms and potential tornadoes in parts of the region...

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp

quote:

Tropical Rainstorm Nicole Brings Heavy Rain and Flooding to the East Coast
Sep 30, 2010 7:58 AM



Although Tropical Storm Nicole dissipated in the Florida Straits Wednesday evening, a remnant circulation remains this morning off the east coast of Florida. The low pressure center will accelerate off to the north-northeast during the day and, by Friday morning, will be moving quickly northward along the mid-Atlantic coast. Although the center of what was once Nicole remains over warm waters, strong wind shear makes it unlikely Nicole will be able to redevelop into a tropical or sub-tropical storm.

Despite the fact the center of Tropical Rainstorm Nicole is still offshore from Florida, deep tropical moisture has already spread northward into the mid-Atlantic and Northeast. This is because a strong upper-level low across the Tennessee Valley is producing a significant southerly upper-level wind flow across the Eastern Seaboard, quickly pulling Nicole's tropical moisture northward. This tropical moisture is working in tandem with the upper low center and a frontal boundary along the East Coast and will produce heavy rainfall today and Friday. Rain amounts of 3 to 6 inches will be common today across the mid-Atlantic states. The heaviest rain will then spread northward into New England and eastern Quebec tonight into Friday. Since much of this rain will be falling in an 8- to 12-hour period in many locations, flash flooding will be a problem from eastern North Carolina through Maine. In addition to the heavy rain, a strong, gusty east to southeast wind along the coasts of the mid-Atlantic and Northeast will cause minor coastal flooding. The winds can gust to around 55 mph today and tonight from the Outer Banks of North Carolina into southern New England. These winds will be strong enough to cause some minor damage in the form of twisted street signs and fallen tree branches.

As heavy bands of rain move north along the mid-Atlantic coast today, some thunderstorms will be embedded in the bands. There is a general twisting motion in the atmosphere today from eastern North Carolina northward into South Jersey with plenty of warm tropical moisture in place. These ingredients will work in tandem in these areas to produce gusty winds and even some tornadoes in the thunderstorms. There were several reports of tornadoes Wednesday in northeastern North Carolina, and this threat will continue to push northward along the mid-Atlantic coastline today.

Elsewhere in the Atlantic Basin, we are tracking two tropical waves across the central Atlantic. The first wave is around 600 miles east of the Windward Islands, moving westward at around 15 mph. Although satellite imagery shows a decent amount of showers and thunderstorms with this wave, strong upper-level winds should keep it from becoming better organized over the next day or two. The second wave we are monitoring is around 1,200 miles east of the Windward Islands as it moves off to the west at 15-20 mph. This wave has a small area of showers and thunderstorms associated with it and seems unlikely to develop over the next 24 hours.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Dan Pydynowski



Last edited by starman1 on Thu Oct 07, 2010 2:15 pm; edited 1 time in total
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starman1





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PostThu Oct 07, 2010 2:02 pm  Reply with quote  

Subtropical Storm "Otto" is now officially the seasons 15th named storm system out in the Atlantic region, and it is wreaking havoc over Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, dumping huge amounts of rain causing severe flooding and mudslides over the Islands. This system, according to expert reports is not expected to directly impact any land areas as a Tropical Storm or Hurricane as it progresses.
( http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp )
We will continue to WATCH it nonetheless.





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starman1





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PostFri Oct 08, 2010 2:05 pm  Reply with quote  

"Otto" is intensifying as it progresses and expert reports suggest it may become a hurricane sometime today but it is not expected to maintain that status due to unfavorable atmospheric conditions present in its predicted path. For now, this system is still being blamed for the continuing rain storms over Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, even though the center of the storm is hundreds of miles away from the islands and headed to the northeast Atlantic.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp


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starman1





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PostSat Oct 09, 2010 2:15 pm  Reply with quote  

"Otto" achieved hurricane status and is holding a CAT 1 classification for the moment as it heads toward the north Atlantic. Experts do not expect it to maintain organization much longer as it heads over cooler water and into atmospheric shear.


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
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starman1





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PostTue Oct 12, 2010 2:06 pm  Reply with quote  

It is official, the seasons 16th named storm and now getting quickly up to speed as hurricane as well, cruising the Caribbean at a CAT 1 classification and showing signs of intensification is Hurricane "Paula". This storm is bringing heavy rains over Nicaragua and Honduras, western Cuba and according to expert reports could impact the eastern Yucatan with heavy rainfall as well before heading northeast toward potentially southern Florida. However; present Navy track maps do not reflect the storms path moving near Florida.
It's a wait and sees game at this point.....

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp





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starman1





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PostWed Oct 13, 2010 2:34 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Paula" has reached CAT 2 classification and is presently on a projected track to target areas of western Cuba. Expert reports remain vague as to the storms path after interacting with Cuba, but present track maps still show the system having potential influence over a wide region of the Caribbean and or Gulf waters up to and including southern Florida.








http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp

quote:

Hurricane Paula to Affect Western Cuba
Oct 13, 2010 7:53 AM



Hurricane Paula is still a Category 2 hurricane with winds of 100 mph as of 8:00 a.m. EDT. Paula, in the northwestern Caribbean Sea, is moving over very warm water, and with light wind shear, some further strengthening is expected over the next 12 hours.

As the hurricane nears the Yucatan Channel, the track of Paula will turn more to the northeast and east threatening western Cuba. A decrease in forward speed is also expected as it enters into a region of very light steering flow. Computer models from this point are showing a wide array of solutions in the track. However, the environment around Paula will become much more hostile by late Thursday and Friday with weakening likely and perhaps rapid weakening possible as Paula interacts with strong wind shear and the rugged terrain of Cuba.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Rob Richards and Rob Miller

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starman1





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PostThu Oct 14, 2010 2:22 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Paula" is presently losing steam, now being recorded as a CAT 1 class system which is facing increasing unfavorable atmospheric conditions conducive for a hurricanes development.
The storm is predicted by the experts to dissipate further as it interacts with Cuba and other opposing forces...






http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp

quote:

Paula Continues to Weaken
Oct 14, 2010 8:34 AM

Paula remains a very tight and compact hurricane with hurricane-force winds extending only 10 miles from its center. An increasingly hostile upper-level wind environment and its interaction with land are weakening the hurricane, and this trend should continue through today.

Paula did not change position much Wednesday night, but it is currently moving to the northeast and will eventually turn the east later today in response to an upper-level trough digging southward across the eastern United States. The center of Paula is just north of western Cuba, and will move over western Cuba later today.

Southwest shear of about 20-30 knots is impacting the hurricane. This wind is shearing some of the deeper convection northeast of the actual center. If anything, shear will only increase over the next 24 to 48 hours as a deep upper-level trough is carved out over the eastern half of the United States. With an increasingly hostile environment developing over Paula, along with its close proximity to Cuba, a gradual weakening trend should continue today. Further weakening is expected Friday as Paula will be tracking either over Cuba or at least close to the shore of Cuba with strong wind shear remaining in place. Paula should weaken to a tropical storm later this morning, then further weaken to a tropical depression this weekend.

At this point, it looks like the impacts of Paula on Florida should be limited, with areas such as Tampa and Orlando getting nothing more than some high clouds filtering across the area from time to time. However, the Florida Keys, southernmost Florida, and the Bahamas can get into a period of steadier, heavier rain or a thunderstorm today through this evening, or at the very least an increase in shower activity. Much of the Bahamas will likely stay fairly active tonight into Friday, while South Florida dries out later tonight. Meanwhile, heavy rain, along with strong, damaging winds and a storm surge of 2-4 feet, will inundate western Cuba. Deadly flooding and landslides will occur, and widespread damage is possible throughout western Cuba.

The rest of the Atlantic basin remains tranquil at this time.

By AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologists Bob Smerbeck and Brian Wimer

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starman1





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PostFri Oct 15, 2010 1:53 pm  Reply with quote  

"Paula" is now just a tropical depression skirting the north coast of Cuba and it is predicted to diminish further as it progresses east.

http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp
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