Chemtrail Central
Login
Member List
Image Database
Chemtrail Forum
Active Topics
Who's Online
Search
Research
Flight Explorer
Unidentifiable
FAQs
Phenomena
Disinformation
Silver Orbs
Transcripts
News Archive
Channelings
Etcetera
PSAs
Media
Vote


Chemtrail Central
Search   FAQs   Messages   Members   Profile
2012 HURRICANE WATCH

Post new topic Reply to topic
Chemtrail Central > Weather

Author Thread
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
2012 HURRICANE WATCH PostFri May 18, 2012 3:26 pm  Reply with quote  

The 2012 Hurricane Season has already begun ahead of the official date line of June 1st.
Out in the East Pacific waters the first named storm of the season "Aletta" has gotten up to qualifying speed, & it is expected to dissipate before impacting any land areas...




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Aletta Moving Slowly Northeastward
May 18, 2012 11:04 AM


Aletta continues to fight against a hostile environment of cool waters, dry air and strong wind shear this morning as Aletta maintains its tropical depression strength. Aletta is currently located about 650 miles to the south-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. The maximum sustained winds remain near 35 mph with some higher gusts.

Aletta is currently moving northeastward at 6 mph. Although the storm is moving towards land, it is expected to dissipate before impacting any land. Aletta will likely dissipate to a remnant low this weekend, if not sooner.

Elsewhere in the eastern Pacific basin, an area of showers and thunderstorms persists a few hundred miles south of Acapulco and will likely encounter a more favorable environment for development over the next couple of days. The system is gradually becoming better organized and may develop into a tropical depression over the weekend.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologists Mike LeSeney and Rob Miller

 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon May 21, 2012 3:37 pm  Reply with quote  

This years Hurricane season has begun in earnest, with storms already brewing on both coast. This watcher was caught by surprise by the arrival of multiple early systems.
Out in the Atlantic, the regions first name storm "Alberto" is hovering in the South East's coastal waters above Florida, but it is not forecast to impact land and it is not expected to increase much in strength before turning to the north and moving out to sea.





http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Tropical Storm Alberto
May 21, 2012 6:26 AM

Tropical Storm Alberto moved slightly south in the last 6 hours and will continue to only jog briefly with an expected turn to the east and northeast later this morning into the afternoon. All watches and warnings have been discontinued along the U.S. Coast as the main impacts of Alberto will stay offshore. There will still be some higher surf along the coast that could lead to rip currents and rough seas for small craft. Sustained winds are around 40 mph with some higher gusts. There will be minor fluctuations in the strength of Alberto during the next 48 hours.

Elsewhere, no other tropical systems are expected to develop over the next 24-48 hours. The Atlantic tropical season officially begins on June 1.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde




The names of this years seasons storms:

2012 Atlantic Storms

Alberto
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William


2012 East Pacific Storms

Aletta
Bud
Carlotta
Daniel
Emilia
Fabio
Gilma
Hector
Ileana
John
Kristy
Lane
Miriam
Norman
Olivia
Paul
Rosa
Sergio
Tara
Vicente
Willa
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke





Presently, in the East Pacific, the seasonís second system is already churning and may according to experts achieve Hurricane status. This system as it qualifies will be named "Bud"...


As it is with the beginning of each year's watch, this watcher offers up a prayer to the Living God.
Heavenly Father, once again we come to the season of storms, namely "Hurricanes" & "Tropical Storms". As before LORD, we ask that any & all innocents that may be in harms way of any of these systems be spared any unnecessary suffering, and that any of those who may be lost due to these events find their way home to you. And, as before Dear GOD, we also ask that if any of these systems are being manipulated beyond Your Will & Nature, that the perpetrators responsible suffer Your Wrath for their crimes......... By Your Heavenly Promise we ask these things, therefore Mighty One make them so, and thank You GOD... a man.


Last edited by starman1 on Sat Jun 16, 2012 1:50 pm; edited 1 time in total
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue May 22, 2012 2:26 pm  Reply with quote  

The Atlantic regions first system "Alberto" has been downgraded to a tropical depression and is forecast to diminish further as it moves northward along the east coast...


http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:


Alberto Weakens

May 21, 2012 11:51 PM

Alberto has weakened to a tropical depression as of 11pm ET Monday evening. This system will continue to move northeastward over the next few days and as it moves will shift into less favorable conditions overall. This will mean that it will be very difficult for any additional strengthening with Alberto. In fact the more likely scenario is further weakening. Impacts to the U.S. will be limited to slightly higher surf along the coast, but otherwise will have no concerns to the inland areas.

Elsewhere, no other tropical systems are expected to develop over the next 24-48 hours. The Atlantic tropical season officially begins on June 1.

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Matthew Rinde




Out in the East Pacific, the season's second named system "Bud" has reached qualifying speed and is presently classed as a Tropical Storm, & it is forecast to increase in speed and potentially reach Hurricane status before impacting the central Mexican coast...

http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/htdocs_dyn_pregen_sat/PUBLIC/tc_pages/pages/tc12/EPAC/02E.BUD/ssmi/track_vis/thumb/Latest.html




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Tropical Storm Bud Forms

May 22, 2012 6:13 AM

Tropical Depression 2 has been upgraded to Tropical Storm Bud. This storm will move on a northwesterly track over the next 1-2 days then turn more northerly and eventually move northeast by the end of the week. Bud will also increase in strength over the next few days before weakening again as it approaches the southern Mexico coast on Saturday. Bud is currently about 515 miles south of Zihuatanejo.

Beyond Wednesday, a weak trough developing over the west coast of the United States will help to steer this system on a more northeasterly track, taking it right into the central Mexican coastline. If conditions remain favorable, the storm could make landfall on Friday as a hurricane, or at least a strong tropical storm.

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com over the next few days as we monitor the progress of Tropical Depression 2.








 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed May 23, 2012 1:55 pm  Reply with quote  

"Bud" is still holding Tropical Storm status off the west coast of southern Mexico. The system may still have the potential to become a Hurricane before running aground somewhere along the Mexican coastline.






http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Tropical Storm Bud Slow to Organize in the Pacific

May 23, 2012 6:28 AM

Tropical Storm Bud continues to churn across the open waters of the Eastern Pacific tracking off to the northwest. Bud will take a northwest to north course over the next day or two as an upper ridge to its north weakens. Eventually, a deepening trough off the Pacific coast of the United States will turn Bud more northeastward by Friday and Saturday as it approaches the Mexican coastline. The storm is having some issues organizing at the present time as it is encountering a zone of southeast wind shear. All of the convection at the moment lies west of the center of circulation. However, Bud is forecast to track over a zone of warm ocean waters with less wind shear over the next couple of days, so gradual strengthening is likely. Convection around Bud's center has become much more vigorous over Tuesday night, which is a sign Bud is organizing. There still is some chance that Bud becomes a hurricane, but it will have to fight off drier air to the west and north of the feature.

Beyond Wednesday, computer forecast model guidance diverges about the speed of Bud approaching the Mexican coast. Some forecast models accelerate Bud northward quickly and have a landfall occurring as soon as Friday. If this were to occur, Bud could possibly be a hurricane at landfall. However, other models show Bud slowing and even weakening as it approaches the Mexican coast on Friday. This would keep Bud over cooler waters along the Mexican coast longer, which means it would probably be a tropical storm. Modeling is now even showing Bud failing to make landfall and recurving before making landfall.

In any of these scenarios, the Mexican states of Colima, Jalisco, Michoacan and perhaps western portions of Guerrero can be threatened by Bud later this week.

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com over the next few days as we monitor the progress of Tropical Storm Bud.

By AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Bob Smerbeck

By AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Evan Duffey




 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu May 24, 2012 2:09 pm  Reply with quote  

The "2012 Hurricane Season" has its first official Hurricane & the season hasn't even officially yet arrived, meet Hurricane"Bud"...
Presently holding at a CAT 1 classification, this system is forecast to gain some in intensity potentially reaching CAT 2 or better before it is forecast to slow down some over less favorable conditions in its projected path & then reaching the shores of Mexico...
Once again, heads up down south...




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Bud Becomes a Hurricane

May 24, 2012 7:00 AM

Overnight Bud strengthened and is now a hurricane southwest of Mexico. While Bud may continue to increase in intensity today, and perhaps even reach category 2 strength, the window for strengthening may be brief. The storm will move over cooler water tonight and Friday, and along with an increase in wind shear this will likely lead to the storm weakening.

Bud will likely track northeast slowly over the next 24 hours, then make more of a turn toward the north or northwest Friday night and Saturday. All interests along the Mexican coast will have to keep an eye on Bud, but it is anticipated that a gradual weakening will occur as the system approaches the coast over the weekend and heads toward the southern end of the Gulf of California. The main impact from the storm along the coast will be rough surf and rip current. If the storm gets close enough to the coast, heavy rain and gusty winds could be a concern for Jalisco and Colima Provinces

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com over the next couple of days as we monitor the progress of Tropical Storm Bud.

The rest of the tropical eastern Pacific is quiet at the current time.

By AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer




 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu May 24, 2012 4:15 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Bud" now CAT 2...

 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri May 25, 2012 2:02 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Bud" is reported to have achieved "Major Hurricane" status yesterday evening reaching an impressive CAT 3 classification with sustained wind speeds of over 115 mph. The system is back down to CAT 2 as of this report, and is predicted to make landfall as a Hurricane this evening hitting the Mexican coast as a forecast CAT 1 system.

http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/atcf_web/image_archives/2012/ep022012.12052506.gif




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Hurricane Bud Back to a Category 2

May 25, 2012 5:20 AM

Hurricane Bud has diminished only slightly from yesterday evening, but enough to return to a Category 2 hurricane. Bud had a brief stint of major hurricane status, lasting just 6 hours before weakening again overnight. Today, Bud will near the Mexican coast as some weakening is anticipated since the system will encounter slightly cooler water and more wind shear. Despite the weakening, we expect Bud to make landfall as a Category 1 hurricane late this evening between Manzanillo, Mexico and Puerto Vallarta, Mexico.

All interests along the Mexican coast will have to keep an eye on Bud as it heads toward the southern end of the Gulf of California. Hurricane-force winds are possible in areas from Manzanillo to Cabo Corrientes. Tropical storm force winds are possible from Punta San Telmo north toward San Blas. Along with the threat for heavy rain and strong winds, a storm surge of a several feet is expected along and just east of the landfall. Rain amounts will range from 4-8 inches at its heaviest point, but even local amounts could reach up to 12 inches

Keep checking back with AccuWeather.com through the weekend as we monitor the progress of Hurricane Bud.

The rest of the tropical eastern Pacific is quiet at the current time.

By AccuWeather.com Senior Meteorologist Matthew Rinde




 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat May 26, 2012 2:15 pm  Reply with quote  

"Bud" quickly dissipated before reaching the Mexican coast, and presently on current satellite imagery there is no real evident remnants of the system visible on current IR imagery.

http://weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_vis.php?image=ir&inv=0&t=cur&region=he


Now, out in the Atlantic region another named system has developed and earned the name "Beryl". This system is presently classed as a Subtropical Storm, swirling in the waters to the northeast of Florida.
This system may be one to keep an eye on as it is now forecast to turn around heading back toward Georgia & or Florida, and condition are presently reported ripe for it to intensify before making landfall along the Southeast coast!

http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/atcf_web/image_archives/2012/al022012.12052606.gif




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp?partner=accuweather


quote:

Subtropical Storm Beryl Christened Off the Carolina Coast

May 26, 2012 8:04 AM

A broad low pressure disturbance that brought heavy rain to Florida and the eastern Bahamas on Thursday, reached an area a few hundred miles east of South Carolina on Friday. Late on Friday night, a well-defined circulation developed within this broad area of low pressure. A buoy near this center of circulation reported a wind speed of 42 knots and sea level pressure of 1001 mb. These measurements, in combination with cooling cloud tops around the tight well-defined circulation precipitated the naming of Subtropical Storm Beryl just before midnight on Saturday. It was centered 305 miles east of Charleston, S.C., near 32.5 north latitude, 74.8 west longitude. This is the second preseason tropical storm to form in the Atlantic Basin for 2012. Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph with gusts to over 55 mph.

The storm was classified as a subtropical storm rather than a tropical storm due to its formation underneath a very weak upper-level trough as well as the strong southwesterly shear over the storm. troposphere. Regardless of these semantics, the impacts in terms of sensible weather are the same, with tropical storm-force winds extending about 100 miles to the east of the center of the system and 0 miles southwest to about 120 miles northwest of the center, with the center located about 300 miles east of Charleston, S.C., as of 11 p.m. EDT on Friday night.

As of 11 p.m. EDT, the storm was moving toward the north at 8 knots. The storm's north momentum should soon end as an upper-level high pressure zone now centered over the interior Southeast expands east and covers the Middle Atlantic states and adjacent waters over the weekend. This upper-level high will effectively stop its northward progress and cause it to turn back toward the south, southwest and direct it slowly toward the Georgia or northeastern Florida coast during the day on Saturday. The precise movement of the storm is difficult to determine due to exactly how the upper-level high builds to the north of the system. Nonetheless, the storm should begin impacting coastal Georgia, southern South Carolina and northeastern Florida with rain squalls by later on Saturday and on Sunday. The most probable course will send the storm inland between Savannah Ga., and St. Augustine, Fla., late on Sunday or Sunday evening. Tropical storm-force winds and heavy rainfall will become possible mostly along the Georgia coast and northern Florida coast later on Sunday and Sunday night. So a tropical storm warning has been issued for this area.

In terms of intensity, the storm will hover over waters that are near 25 to 26C, which are warm enough to allow for further intensification should the upper-level wind shear subside. Based on the building heights near and north of the storm, shear should probably diminish to allow for some additional intensification this weekend. Currently, cloud tops are cooling on the west side of the storm, however, little convection and considerable dry air is found on the east side of the system. This asymmetric pattern should preclude any short-term intensification. However, a more favorable upper-level wind regime (limited shear) and relatively warm waters (25-26C) will likely allow the system to develop a more symmetric pattern of convection and permit intensification later on Saturday or Sunday prior to reaching the Southeast coastline.

Impacts from Beryl will be mostly heavy rainfall of 3-6 inches along and inland from the Georgia coast to northern Florida. Beryl will move far enough inland to bring this heavier rainfall to parts of northern Florida and far southeastern Georgia on Sunday night into Monday. There is the chance the storm could stall for an extended period of time which could produce much heavier rainfall. Winds of 50-60 mph are expected along and near where Beryl makes landfall late on Sunday or Sunday evening. Those winds will subside somewhat once the storm moves inland. However, Beryl could remain a tropical storm into Monday.

Long range computer forecasts suggest two possible scenarios for Beryl beyond Monday. Either the storm will fall apart over northern Florida and southeastern Georgia or will be forced back to the east northeast and over water. The second scenario is starting to show up on more computer models. If this second scenario becomes more of the real option, the storm will move back over water and move north-northeast along the Carolina coast on Tuesday and Wednesday of next week. This could impact coastal sections of South and North Carolina with wind and rain.

Elsewhere, no other tropical systems are expected to develop over the next 48-72 hours. The Atlantic tropical season officially begins on June 1.

Written by AccuWeather meteorologist Dan Kotlowski and Todd Miner




 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostMon May 28, 2012 12:15 am  Reply with quote  

"Beryl" is on track to impact the Southeast coast of Florida & Georgia as a Tropical Storm this evening.
 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostTue May 29, 2012 2:21 pm  Reply with quote  

"Beryl" continues to maintain its structure over land and has been classed as a "Tropical Rainstorm"... This system is forecast to maintain its organization as it moves back out to the Atlantic, potentially regaining in strength but expert reports and Navy track maps still maintain it will move away from the East Coast heading back out to sea...

http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/htdocs_dyn_pregen_sat/PUBLIC/tc_pages/pages/tc12/ATL/02L.BERYL/ssmi/track_vis/thumb/Latest.html




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Beryl Mostly a Rainmaker

May 29, 2012 7:29 AM

Tropical Rainstorm Beryl is moving very slowly over southern Georgia and continues to bring heavy rain across the region. The storm will move slowly northeastward today, with a gradual increase in forward speed tonight and Wednesday. The center will move just inland across South Carolina tonight into Wednesday, emerging back over the Atlantic near the border of South Carolina and North Carolina late Wednesday or Wednesday night. The strength of the system should change very little while it remains over land. Once it moves back over water it may strengthen somewhat, perhaps reaching tropical storm strength once again for a short time before it accelerates northeastward away from land over the open Atlantic.

The main effects from Beryl will continue to be from rain across the Southeast. Showers and thunderstorms will be locally heavy and could bring an additional 2 to 5 inches of rain today through Wednesday. This is not necessarily all bad news since this part of the Nation has been in a severe drought. However there could be some temporary flooding problems where rain comes too quickly.

Elsewhere, no organized tropical weather is expected over the next couple of days. Disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the west-central Caribbean may get drawn north and northeast across Cuba and perhaps affect the Bahamas and South Florida Thursday night and Friday. Shear will keep this are very unfavorable for development.

By AccuWeather.com Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer






 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostWed May 30, 2012 2:28 pm  Reply with quote  

"Beryl" is still an active system hovering over the Carolina s, delivering lots of rain. The system is still forecast to move offshore and away from land where it is predicted to dissipate out in the open Atlantic...


http://weather.unisys.com/satellite/sat_wv_hem_loop-12.gif

In the water vapor satellite image loop above, I can't help but notice the action and density & direction of travel of the developing systems over Oklahoma & Texas. What timing! I could have (and should have) taken the chance of predicted them appearing in this area moving toward Beryl's direction, thereby helping to move the atmospheric currents away from our shores, but I didn't...
Maybe next time... We have seen this action repeatedly in the past, co-incidence??? me thinks not.......






http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/atlantic/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Beryl Skirting the Carolina Coast

May 30, 2012 7:36 AM

Tropical Rainstorm Beryl is moving northeastward along the coast of northern South Carolina this morning and continues to bring bands of heavy rain across northeastern South Carolina and eastern North Carolina. The storm will move northeastward with an increase in forward speed today, skirting the coast of North Carolina, then moves offshore into the open Atlantic tonight. As the storm moves back over water it will re-strengthen a little, and will reach minimal tropical-storm strength once again for a short time later today or tonight into Thursday. However, an upper-level system moving into the eastern U.S. will force Beryl to accelerate northeastward over colder water during Thursday. This will cause the system to transition into a non-tropical storm over the open waters of the Atlantic. Our current forecast puts Beryl on a course away from any land mass once it leaves the North Carolina coast tonight.

The main effects from Beryl will continue to be from rain across the eastern Carolinas. Rain and thunderstorms will be locally heavy and could bring an additional 2 to 5 inches of rain through early tonight. Except for some localized flooding the rain has been a positive affect on the region. This area of the U.S. is suffering from a severe drought and this rainfall will help put a big dent into the very dry weather. While Beryl will likely become a tropical storm again for a time, the strongest winds will be on the east and southeast side of the storm, which will be offshore, and these tropical storm-force winds are not expected to occur on land

Disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the west-central Caribbean may get drawn north and northeast across Cuba and perhaps affect the Bahamas and South Florida on Thursday night and Friday. Shear should keep this area of active weather from becoming better organized.

Elsewhere, no organized tropical weather is expected over the next couple of days.

By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologists Dan Kottlowski and Brian Wimer



 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostThu May 31, 2012 2:14 pm  Reply with quote  

"Beryl" has drifted out to sea moving away from the East coast in a hurry and appears to be no further threat to any land areas...


 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Jun 01, 2012 2:25 pm  Reply with quote  

"Beryl" is tracking out in the open Atlantic, here is a very interesting photo of its aftermath with TRAILS! in it, I'm sure they're just "ship tracks"Rolling Eyes

 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostFri Jun 15, 2012 1:49 pm  Reply with quote  

The East Pacific region has spawned it's third named storm system for the season. "Carlotta" has achieved Tropical Storm classification and is headed toward Hurricane status as it intensifies skirting the southwest coast of Mexico, headed toward Acapulco. It is forecast to potentially impact somewhere along the coast as a Hurricane at upward of a CAT 2 classification. This system is predicted to produce excessive rainfall totals upward of over a foot or greater if it stalls along the way in addition to its winds and surge factors.
Heads up down south again.........


http://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/tc-bin/tc_home2.cgi?




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Carlotta Nearing Hurricane Strength

Jun 15, 2012 8:04 AM

Carlotta is a strengthening tropical storm in the East Pacific tropical basin. As of Friday morning, the storm is packing winds of 70 mph and is moving to the northwest at 10 mph. The storm will continue to strengthen this morning, becoming a hurricane during the next several hours. A hurricane warning is in effect for the Pacific coast of Mexico from Salina Cruz to Punta Maldonado. A hurricane watch is in effect from east of Salina Cruz to Barra de Tonala and west of Punta Maldonado to Acapulco. The storm is tracking over water that is 30 degrees Celsius or 86 degrees Fahrenheit and is in an area of relatively weak shear. These favorable conditions will allow the storm to continue to strengthen. Computer based intensity forecasts suggest Carlotta could reach wind speeds of 80 to 90 mph and perhaps even intensify to a Category 2 hurricane with winds of over 95 mph before it starts to interact with the terrain of southern Mexico on Saturday. Once it starts to interact with land, it will start to weaken. We expect this to happen later Saturday and Saturday night. Carlotta is being steered by an upper-level high pressure area that extends from the northwestern Caribbean westward into southeastern Mexico. This is putting Carlotta on a northwest course. The upper-level high pressure area is expected to extend farther west by Saturday, and this could cause the stirring currents to weaken causing Carlotta to stall or loop along the coast. Carlotta will impact a large part of the southern Mexican coast from near Acapulco to the border with Guatemala. The impacts will include torrential rainfall of 6-12 inches, a storm surge of 1-3 feet and winds of tropical storm force with gusts to hurricane force near and along the coast. The heavier rainfall will occur in the higher terrain where some isolated areas could pick up well over a foot of rainfall. If Carlotta stalls, rainfall could double in the higher terrain. By AccuWeather Expert Senior Meteorologist Brian Wimer



 View user's profile Send private message
starman1





Joined: 29 Sep 2005
Posts: 1583
Location: Earth
PostSat Jun 16, 2012 1:49 pm  Reply with quote  

Hurricane "Carlotta" impacted the Mexican coast last evening as a strong CAT 1 class storm, and is now diminishing in intensity and has been downgraded to a Tropical Storm once again.
This system still posses a threat as it is forecast to be quite a rain maker for the affected region, expert reports still forecast upward of a foot of rain to some areas...




http://hurricane.accuweather.com/hurricane/epacific/basin.asp?partner=accuweather

quote:

Carlotta Now a Tropical Storm

Jun 16, 2012 8:31 AM


Carlotta made landfall last night between Puerto Angel and Acapulco Mexico with sustained winds near 90 mph. Since that time, the system has continued inland, bringing heavy rain and high winds to coastal Mexico as well as some of the interior mountainous regions along the coast. Winds have dropped to 55 mph, weakening quickly into a tropical storm. Because of this, the hurricane warnings have been discontinued. A tropical storm warning is in effect for areas west of Punta Maldonado to Acapulco. Carlotta is being steered by an upper-level high pressure area that extends from the northwestern Caribbean westward into southeastern Mexico. The storm might start to loop around and remain near the coast for a couple of days. This could bring coastal and mountainous areas of southern Mexico very heavy rainfall. Carlotta will impact a large part of the southern Mexican area centered near Acapulco and Punta Maldonado. The impacts will include torrential rainfall of 6-12 inches in mountainous areas, and a continued surge along the coast between 1 and 3 feet. The heavier rainfall will occur in the higher terrain just inland from the coast where some isolated areas could pick up well over a foot of rainfall. The rain will be the major threat from Carlotta, mudslides and loss of life are both possible. By AccuWeather Meteorologist Mark Paquette






 View user's profile Send private message

Post new topic Reply to topic
Forum Jump:
Jump to:  
Goto page
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are GMT.
The time now is Sat Nov 18, 2017 9:36 am


  Display posts from previous:      




© 21st Century Thermonuclear Productions
All Rights Reserved, All Wrongs Revenged, Novus Ordo Seclorum, All Your Base