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Ronald Reagen's real record

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Swamp Gas





Joined: 06 Jun 2001
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Location: On a Hill in the Lowlands
Ronald Reagen's real record PostMon Jun 07, 2004 1:06 pm  Reply with quote  




AS the usual hype surrounds Reagen's passing, much like what happened when Tricky Dick died, here's some of Reagen's accomplisnments:

1) Turncoat on Hollywood friends, of which he turned in many as "Communists"

2) Spokesman for General Electric Corp, and the "safety" of nuclear power. A quote by GE chairman Charles Wilson right before reagen started his promotion of GE military-industrial ideas.


quote:
If the people were not convinced that the free world is in danger it would be impossible for Congress to vote for the vast sums now being spent to avert this danger.


3) Iran-Contra

4) Supplying weapons to Hussein

5) Supplying weapons to Bin LAden

6) pulls a fast one on the U.S. Mint in order to convince his depositors that the city's economy is stronger than it is. Reagan was cleverly able to take the plot of a TV show, portraying William Chapman, (based on a true story), rename it 'Reaganomics', and sell it to the entire country all over again on television in his role as President.

7) he believed that the end of the world -- the Battle of Armageddon -- was close at hand.

8) Central American dead squads support

9) Thought Nelson Mandela is a terrorist

10) Destroying the air traffic controller union.

11) Invading Grenada

Reagan quotes:

"A tree's a tree. How many more do you need to look at?"
--Ronald Reagan (Governor of California), quoted in the Sacramento Bee, opposing expansion of Redwood National Park, March 3, 1966

"I don't believe a tree is a tree and if you've seen one you've seen them all."
--Governor Ronald Reagan, in the Sacramento Bee, September 14, 1966

"All the waste in a year from a nuclear power plant can be stored under a desk."
--Ronald Reagan (Republican candidate for president), quoted in the Burlington (Vermont) Free Press, February 15, 1980. (In reality, the average nuclear reactor generates 30 tons of radioactive waste per year.)

"I have flown twice over Mount St. Helens. I'm not a scientist and I don't know the figures, but I have a suspicion that one little mountain out there, in these last several months, has probably released more sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere than has been released in the last ten years of automobile driving or things of that kind."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in Time magazine, October 20, 1980. (According to scientists, Mount St. Helens emitted about 2,000 tons of sulfur dioxide per day at its peak activity, compared with 81,000 tons per day produced by cars.)

"Growing and decaying vegetation in this land are responsible for 93 percent of the oxides of nitrogen."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in the Los Angeles Times, October 9, 1980. (According to Dr. Michael Oppenheimer of the Environmental Defense Fund, industrial sources are responsible for at least 65 percent and possibly as much as 90 percent of the oxides of nitrogen in the U.S.)

"Approximately 80 percent of our air pollution stems from hydrocarbons released by vegetation. So let's not go overboard in setting and enforcing tough emission standards for man-made sources."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in Sierra, September 10, 1980

"I've said it before and I'll say it again. The U.S. Geological Survey has told me that the proven potential for oil in Alaska alone is greater than the proven reserves in Saudi Arabia."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in the Detroit Free Press, March 23, 1980. (According to the USGS, the Saudi reserves of 165.5 billion barrels are 17 times the proven reserves--9.2 billion barrels--in Alaska.)

"Why should we subsidize intellectual curiosity?"
--Ronald Reagan, campaign speech, 1980

"Trains are not any more energy efficient than the average automobile, with both getting about 48 passenger miles to the gallon."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in the Chicago Tribune, May 10, 1980. (The U.S. Department of Transportation calculates that a 14-car train traveling at 80 miles per hour gets 400 passenger miles to the gallon. A 1980 auto carrying an average of 2.2 people gets 42.6 passenger miles to the gallon.)

"It's silly talking about how many years we will have to spend in the jungles of Vietnam when we could pave the whole country and put parking stripes on it and still be home by Christmas."
--Ronald Reagan (candidate for Governor of California), interviewed in the Fresno Bee, October 10, 1965

"I have a feeling that we are doing better in the war [in Vietnam] than the people have been told."
--Ronald Reagan, in the Los Angeles Times, October 16, 1967

"...the moral equal of our Founding Fathers."
--President Reagan, describing the Nicaraguan contras, March 1, 1985

"Fascism was really the basis for the New Deal."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in Time, May 17, 1976

"I know all the bad things that happened in that war. I was in uniform four years myself."
--President Reagan, in an interview with foreign journalists, April 19, 1985. ("In costume" is more like it. Reagan spent World War II making Army training films at Hal Roach Studios in Hollywood.)

"They've done away with those committees. That shows the success of what the Soviets were able to do in this country."
--Ronald Reagan, quoted in the Washington Times, September 30, 1987. (Reagan longs for the days of Sen. Joseph McCarthy and the HCUA witch hunts.)

"We think there is a parallel between federal involvement in education and the decline in profit over recent years."
--President Reagan, quoted in USA Today, April 26, 1983

"What we have found in this country, and maybe we're more aware of it now, is one problem that we've had, even in the best of times, and that is the people who are sleeping on the grates, the homeless who are homeless, you might say, by choice."
--President Reagan, defending himself against charges of callousness on Good Morning America, January 31, 1984

"I favor the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and it must be enforced at the point of a bayonet, if necessary."
--Ronald Reagan, Los Angeles Times, October 20, 1965

"I would have voted against the Civil Rights Act of 1964."
--Ronald Reagan, Los Angeles Times, June 17, 1966

"If there has to be a bloodbath then let's get it over with."
--Ronald Reagan (Governor of California), quoted in the San Francisco Chronicle, May 15, 1969. (Reagan reveals how he intends to deal with student protesters at the University of California, Berkeley.)

"Today a newcomer to the state is automatically eligible for our many aid programs the moment he crosses the border."
--Ronald Reagan, in a speech announcing his candidacy for Governor, January 3, 1966. (In fact, immigrants to California had to wait five years before becoming eligible for benefits. Reagan acknowledged his error, but nine months later said exactly the same thing.)

"...a faceless mass, waiting for handouts."
--Ronald Reagan, 1965. (Description of Medicaid recipients.)

"Unemployment insurance is a pre-paid vacation for freeloaders."
--California Governor Ronald Reagan, in the Sacramento Bee, April 28, 1966

"We were told four years ago that 17 million people went to bed hungry every night. Well, that was probably true. They were all on a diet."
--Ronald Reagan, TV speech, October 27, 1964

"But I also happen to be someone who believes in tithing--the giving of a tenth [to charity]."
--Ronald Reagan, from The Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents, February 8, 1982. (He may believe in tithing, but he doesn't practice it. Reagan's total charitable giving of $5,965 did not approach 10% of total income. It was more like 1.4%.)

"[Not] until now has there ever been a time in which so many of the prophecies are coming together. There have been times in the past when people thought the end of the world was coming, and so forth, but never anything like this."
--President Reagan revealing a disturbing view about the "coming of Armageddon," December 6, 1983

"History shows that when the taxes of a nation approach about 20 percent of the people's income, there begins to be a lack of respect for government.... When it reaches 25 percent, there comes an increase in lawlessness."
--Ronald Reagan, in Time, April 14, 1980. (History shows no such thing. Income tax rates in Europe have traditionally been far higher than U.S. rates, while European crime rates have been much lower.)

"Because Vietnam was not a declared war, the veterans are not even eligible for the G. I. Bill of Rights with respect to education or anything."
--Ronald Reagan, in Newsweek, April 21, 1980. (Wrong again.)

"Politics is just like show business. You have a hell of an opening, coast for a while, and then have a hell of a close."
--Ronald Reagan to aide Stuart Spencer, 1966


Killer Trees.
After opining in August 1980 that "trees cause more pollution than automobiles do," Reagan arrived at a campaign rally to find a tree decorated with this sign: "Chop me down before I kill again."


Guns of Brixton.
"In England, if a criminal carried a gun, even though he didn't use it, he was tried for first-degree murder and hung if he was found guilty," Ronald Reagan claimed in April 1982. When informed that the story was "just not true," White House spokesman Larry Speakes said, "Well, it's a good story, though. It made the point, didn't it?" Reagan repeated the story again on March 21, 1986 during an interview with The New York Times.

The Liberator.
In November 1983, Reagan told visiting Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir that he had served as a photographer in a U.S. Army unit assigned to film Nazi death camps. He repeated the story to Simon Wiesenthal the following February. Reagan never visited or filmed a concentration camp; he spent World War II in Hollywood, making training films with the First Motion Picture Unit of the Army Air Corps.

Arms for Hostages.
"We did not--repeat, did not--trade weapons or anything else for hostages, nor will we," Reagan proclaimed in November 1986. Four months later, on March 4, 1987, Reagan admitted in a televised national address, "A few months ago, I told the American people I did not trade arms for hostages. My heart and my best intentions still tell me that's true, but the facts and the evidence tell me it is not."

Cadillac Queens.
Over a period of about five years, Reagan told the story of the "Chicago welfare queen" who had 80 names, 30 addresses, 12 Social Security cards, and collected benefits for "four nonexisting deceased husbands," bilking the government out of "over $150,000." The real welfare recipient to whom Reagan referred was actually convicted for using two different aliases to collect $8,000. Reagan continued to use his version of the story even after the press pointed out the actual facts of the case to him.

Balance the Budget And Increase Defense Spending?
The Reagan administration introduced the 1981 Economic Recovery Act by claiming that it would cut taxes by 30 percent, increase defense spending by three-quarters of a trillion dollars, and achieve a balanced budget within three years. Budget director David Stockman admitted in November of 1981 that, "None of us really understands what's going on with all these numbers" and that supply-side economics "was always a Trojan horse to bring down the top rate."

Whelll,

To commerate the passing of the greatest president since Clinton, and The Two George's, and a genuine Leader of the Common Person, and all around incredible impersonator of Howdy Doody, I dug up two old recordings.

1) This is Ronnie doing "Live from the Moon" Rap back in 1981, a pioneer in Hip Hop who was known as Grandmaster Gipper.

Live From The Moon


2) A very rare recording of Ronnie leaving a message for Tricky Dick Nixon back in 1982, before Hard Drives were invented. Another glimpse at the genius and precognition of "Bonzo"

Ron Phone





As a final note, Reagen could have been helped by Stem Cell Cloning, which he and his Fundamnetalist Base vehemently oppose. The Europeans are now using Stem Cell to possibly cure Diabetes and Alzheimer's amongst others. Nancy is very upset over this. I hope this triggers her to stop backing up these zealots and step into The Light





[Edited 4 times, lastly by swamp gas on 06-07-2004]
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Thetaloops





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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 4:04 pm  Reply with quote  

I did all dat! OOOOO! I been a bad boy!



So any way let's have cake!


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Swamp Gas





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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 4:27 pm  Reply with quote  

And now since Reagen has joined another illuminary, Tricky Dick, Dumbya's medium will be contacting them to see what his next step will be









[Edited 7 times, lastly by swamp gas on 06-07-2004]
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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 7:22 pm  Reply with quote  



66 (Unflattering) Things About Ronald Reagan

By David Corn, The Nation
June 6, 2004

Editor's Note: This list of "66 Things to Think about When Flying in to Reagan National Airport" appeared in the Nation on March 2, 1998 after the renaming of Washington National Airport after Ronald Reagan. As Corn says, "the piece remains relevant today – particularly as a cheat sheet for those who dare to point out the Reagan presidency was not all that glorious and was more nightmare in America than morning in America."


The firing of the air traffic controllers, winnable nuclear war, recallable nuclear missiles, trees that cause pollution, Elliott Abrams lying to Congress, ketchup as a vegetable, colluding with Guatemalan thugs, pardons for F.B.I. lawbreakers, voodoo economics, budget deficits, toasts to Ferdinand Marcos, public housing cutbacks, redbaiting the nuclear freeze movement, James Watt.


Getting cozy with Argentine fascist generals, tax credits for segregated schools, disinformation campaigns, "homeless by choice," Manuel Noriega, falling wages, the HUD scandal, air raids on Libya, "constructive engagement" with apartheid South Africa, United States Information Agency blacklists of liberal speakers, attacks on OSHA and workplace safety, the invasion of Grenada, assassination manuals, Nancy's astrologer.


Drug tests, lie detector tests, Fawn Hall, female appointees (8 percent), mining harbors, the S&L scandal, 239 dead U.S. troops in Beirut, Al Haig "in control," silence on AIDS, food-stamp reductions, Debategate, White House shredding, Jonas Savimbi, tax cuts for the rich, "mistakes were made."


Michael Deaver's conviction for influence peddling, Lyn Nofziger's conviction for influence peddling, Caspar Weinberger's five-count indictment, Ed Meese ("You don't have many suspects who are innocent of a crime"), Donald Regan (women don't "understand throw-weights"), education cuts, massacres in El Salvador.


"The bombing begins in five minutes," $640 Pentagon toilet seats, African-American judicial appointees (1.9 percent), Reader's Digest, C.I.A.-sponsored car-bombing in Lebanon (more than eighty civilians killed), 200 officials accused of wrongdoing, William Casey, Iran/contra. "Facts are stupid things," three-by-five cards, the MX missile, Bitburg, S.D.I., Robert Bork, naps, Teflon.


David Corn, Washington editor of the Nation, is author of 'The Lies of George W. Bush: Mastering the Politics of Deception
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Swamp Gas





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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 7:32 pm  Reply with quote  

They are literally during a post-mordem canonizing of ol' sawdust head.

Rush Limburger's hero, and all around back-stabber, Ronald Wilson Reagen.

Six letters in each name.....666

The religious Nuts also came into power under him, such as Pat Robertson and Falwell.





[Edited 3 times, lastly by swamp gas on 06-07-2004]
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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 9:06 pm  Reply with quote  

This week is perfect for the Neo-Nazi's G-8,$#@#!,and now Bonzo's funeral.Beware of 6/11.

[Edited 1 times, lastly by increase 1776 on 06-07-2004]
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PostMon Jun 07, 2004 9:13 pm  Reply with quote  

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Swamp Gas





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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 12:44 am  Reply with quote  

George H. W. Bush on Reagan


quote:
a lot happened on his watch that was very, very positive towards a new world order
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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 12:51 am  Reply with quote  

Many insiders say that Bush Sr. attempted to have Ronald Reagan killed in 1981.


Liberty Think | June 6 2004

WASHINGTON — Ronald Reagan, the optimistic, patriotic Hollywood actor who as the nation's 40th president revived the conservative movement in America, died Saturday.

Reagan, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease in 1994, died at his Los Angeles home. He was 93.
[...]
He also devalued the idea of a strong central government — to the chagrin of his detractors and delight of his supporters.

After he was shot... two months into his presidency... he told his wife, Nancy: "Honey, I forgot to duck."

Brian Quig wrote in 1991:

Goldwater's Administrative Director Tom Dunlevy... was an insider at the [1908 GOP] convention... I will always remember the very words of Tom Dunlevy following my protest of the selection of George Bush for VP. They were etched into my mind. "We didn't like that either. It was a deal with the Devil. Henry Kissinger and Gerald Ford, present at the convention as agents of David Rockefeller, assured Reagan the presidency if he accepted Bush on the ticket. Otherwise Rockefeller would swing the election to Carter."

Cleon Skousen spoke with Reagan at the convention, both before and after the Bush decision, and related how Reagan told how Kissinger and Ford with the support of Walter Cronkite coerced him. According to Skousen these are Reagan's very words "They showed me the brush by which I would be tarred if I did not go along." After the election, when George Bush's top man, campaign manager James Baker, became Reagan's chief of staff -- the one person who controlled who saw the president -- the betrayal of conservatism was complete.
After Reagan was allegedly shot by John Hinckley, Jr. barely two months into his first term, this curious item turns up in the Associated Press March 31, 1981:

Scott Hinckley, brother of John W. Hinckley Jr., who allegedly shot Reagan, was to have dined tonight in Denver at the home of Neil Bush, one of the vice president's sons...

Scott Hinckley [is] vice president of his father's Denver-based firm, Vanderbilt Energy Corp... Neil Bush lives in Denver, where he works for Standard Oil Co. of Indiana.

In 1978, Neil served as campaign manager for his brother, George W. Bush, the vice president's oldest son, who made an unsuccessful bid for Congress. Neil lived in Lubbock throughout much of 1978, where John Hinckley lived from 1974 through 1980...

Sharon Bush, Neil's wife, said... "From what I know and I've heard, they (the Hinckleys) are a very nice family and have given a lot of money to the Bush campaign."

We can also see that George W. Bush was just as honest and straightforward a man in 1981 as he is today -- UPI March 31, 1981:
Another of the vice president's sons, George W. Bush, lived in Lubbock in 1978 and ran unsuccessfully for Congress. Police have said John Hinckley Jr. lived in Lubbock at that time and once attended Texas Tech University.

Young George Bush did not recall meeting the suspect.

"It's certainly conceivable that I met him or might have been introduced to him," he said. "I don't recognize his face from the brief, kind of distorted thing they had on TV and the name doesn't ring any bells."
Researcher John Judge, currently head of 9/11 Citizens Watch, pulled together threads in November 2000:

In the period when Reagan came in, I believe Bush took over. He was vice president and rose to power, I believe, on March 31 1981 when Reagan was nearly assassinated. The person placed as the patsy, not the person that actually shot Reagan but the person placed as the patsy in the case, was John Hinckley. His family ties were to oil. Through that oil connection, Neil Bush -- George Herbert Walker Bush's son, who worked in oil -- knew Scott Hinckley who also worked in oil. Neil had been involved with Scott in many oil operations -- both working for oil speculation and oil companies.

The two families lived close to each other. They knew each other socially and financially. When the Hinckley oil company started to fail in the sixties, Bush's Zapata Oil financially bailed out Hinckley's company. It went from being Vanderbilt Oil to Vanderbilt Energy or Vanderbilt Resources in the 60s after Bush intervened. The Hinckleys had been running an operation with six dead wells but then they were making several million dollars a year after the Bush bailout. I always thought this was some sort of a money-pass front where they were laundering money through on this phony oil operation but actually operating some type of an intelligence pay-off.

The father in that family, John W. Hinckley Sr., was also the president of the board for World Vision. World Vision is a far-right evangelical missionary operation that does missionary and "good work" operations in countries where there is a political purpose for it to be there.

[...]
The Secret Service helped to set-up Reagan too. Reagan was told not to wear his vest that day -- his protective vest. I'll bet he wore it after that. They did not call the procedure with the limousine. He should have come out the door and gone directly into the limousine. That's how he arrived.

He came, the Secret Service formed two rows on either side of the back door, they opened the back door and he goes in. When you hire a limousine, they don't go to the house down the street, they come to your door. When you're the president, they'll move it six inches to make sure that it's in the right place. It was in the right place when he arrived. He got out and went in through the phalanx of the two rows of agents. He's safe into the VIP entrance.

He comes out the same exit and where's the car?' It is nowhere near the door. It's 40-50 feet down the pavement. So, he's got to walk out into the open. What's supposed to happen? The Secret Service is supposed to surround him like a diamond and protect him. One guy goes forward, McCarthy, to open the door for him. The rest don't surround him. They all file out like a line of ducks off to the right and they leave Reagan walking in the open with Brady and these other guys. Then, the shooting happens.

The damage that was done there once the shooting started was quite extensive. Brady was hit which literally took a large chunk of his brain and knocked him on to the ground. A black cop was nicked in the neck, a big beefy cop, and he spun and hit the ground hard by the shot. McCarthy, 160 pounds, was lifted by the shot, that hit him in the groin at the back door of the car, and thrown through the air to the front bumper of the car. He himself says that was no 22.

All of the early press reports said that Hinckley was firing a 38 and that is much more consistent with these kinds of reactions. A 22 will hurt you, enter you and do damage inside you, but it's not going to knock you over. A 38 is a much larger caliber of bullet. Hinckley purchased a 38 at a pawn shop on Elm Street in Dallas -- the same street where Kennedy was assassinated...

Then the official story changes after three or four hours and Hinckley supposedly had a 22. I went through the ABC footage and you can actually see the replacement of the 22 and the pick-up of the 38 by a Secret Service agent.
[...]
Hinckley, instead of being taken under civilian custody or even federal custody -- he is in a military district in DC but he is also in several federal districts -- he's whisked off to Quantico Marine Base and that's where he is held for questioning. I think that that was part of his debriefing and deprogramming. But he's not taken under civilian control, he's taken under military custody.

Then he's moved from there for psychiatric evaluation to Fort Butner, South Carolina, which was the first prison that was developed where the cells (and the blueprints) were called labs. It was the first mind-control experimentation prison in the country. He spends his time down there. Again with a group of psychiatrists that are interlinked with other assassinations and then he is eventually brought to court and declared not guilty by reason of insanity for the assassination attempt.

It's a convoluted story but the patterns are always the same. You have a patsy that takes the blame. You have a second gunman that never comes to light.

And indeed, Reagan told the Associated Press he thought he was shot by a Secret Service agent in an interview published in The New York Times April 23, 1981):

"I knew I'd been hurt, but I thought that I'd been hurt by the Secret Service man landing on me in the car, and it was, I must say, it was the most paralyzing pain. I've described it as if someone had hit you with a hammer.

But that sensation, it seemed to me, came after I was in the car, and so I thought that maybe his gun or something... suddenly I found that I was coughing up blood."

Then, after Reagan got himself to George Washington Hospital despite attempts to bring him to the Bethesda Naval Base, Michael Gilson De Lemos, author and member of the National Committee of the US Libertarian Party, picks up the story, writing on January 20, 2002:
When Reagan was shot, he apparently assumed that his Vice President did it. How do I know this? From the fascinating information that my mother, who volunteered at the hospital where he was taken and was a friend of his from the old Hollywood days, shared with me. It seems that shortly after he woke up, he asked for a DC patrol officer, had this person find a US ship that had just reached the area, and soon sailors with sidearms guarded his bedside while he placed the whole hospital under his direct command and swore all to secrecy. They buffered him from the Secret Service and anyone else. He trusted no one—and perhaps, by protecting himself with unentangled sailors and officers fresh from sea, saved his own life, and the country from one more black mark of shame.
One fellow Catcher in the Rye devotee and .38 caliber enthusiast -- and 'guest' of WorldVision -- was alleged (apparent?) Lennon assassin Mark David Chapman.
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zoobie555





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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 1:23 am  Reply with quote  

Yeah, and now Hinkley is allowed to leave the hospital freely on weekends to visit his parents, un-chaparoned. That never happened before you-know-who was in the whitehouse.
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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 4:43 am  Reply with quote  

Let's not forget the fact that after testifing against Noreiga,Carlos Lehder walks out the back door never to see his jail cell again.Got to reward those that help you. Thanks Daddy Bush. This is sure distracting from the realities of the day.Hell, that's the purpose of all this B.S.

[Edited 1 times, lastly by increase 1776 on 06-07-2004]
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increase 1776





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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 5:01 am  Reply with quote  

Bye-Bye Ronnie
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Swamp Gas





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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 3:02 pm  Reply with quote  

Not yet Increase!! There's more!

Top 11 ways Dubya will honor the memory of Ronald Wilson Reagan.

1. Ignore AIDS.

2. Invade a Caribbean nation after a military setback in the Middle East and just before the election.

3. Plant ketchup garden.

4. Tell a grand jury he "can't recall" 150 times.

5. Keep bin Laden on the payroll.

6. Plot overthrow of democratically elected government in South America.

7. Take another month-long vacation.

8. Spend sleepless afternoon worrying about impeachment.

9. Continue not going to church.

10. Nominate both of Scalia's sons to the Supreme Court.

11. Let his Vice President run the show.

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Swamp Gas





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PostTue Jun 08, 2004 9:07 pm  Reply with quote  

Planet Reagan

By William Rivers Pitt



Ronald Reagan is dead now, and everyone is being nice to him. In every aspect, this is appropriate. He was a husband and a father, a beloved member of a family, and he will be missed by those he was close to. His death was long, slow and agonizing because of the Alzheimer's Disease which ruined him, one drop of lucidity at a time. My grandmother died ten years ago almost to the day because of this disease, and this disease took ten years to do its dirty, filthy, wretched work on her.

The dignity and candor of Reagan's farewell letter to the American people was as magnificent a departure from public life as any that has been seen in our history, but the ugly truth of his illness was that he lived on, and on, and on. His family and friends watched as he faded from the world of the real, as the simple dignity afforded to all life collapsed like loose sand behind his ever more vacant eyes. Only those who have seen Alzheimer's Disease invade a mind can know the truth of this. It is a cursed way to die.

In this mourning space, however, there must be room made for the truth. Writer Edward Abbey once said, "The sneakiest form of literary subtlety, in a corrupt society, is to speak the plain truth. The critics will not understand you; the public will not believe you; your fellow writers will shake their heads."

The truth is straightforward: Virtually every significant problem facing the American people today can be traced back to the policies and people that came from the Reagan administration. It is a laundry list of ills, woes and disasters that has all of us, once again, staring apocalypse in the eye.

How can this be? The television says Ronald Reagan was one of the most beloved Presidents of the 20th century. He won two national elections, the second by a margin so overwhelming that all future landslides will be judged by the high-water mark he achieved against Walter Mondale. How can a man so universally respected have played a hand in the evils which corrupt our days?

The answer lies in the reality of the corrupt society Abbey spoke of. Our corruption is the absolute triumph of image over reality, of flash over substance, of the pervasive need within most Americans to believe in a happy-face version of the nation they call home, and to spurn the reality of our estate as unpatriotic. Ronald Reagan was, and will always be, the undisputed heavyweight champion of salesmen in this regard.

Reagan was able, by virtue of his towering talents in this arena, to sell to the American people a flood of poisonous policies. He made Americans feel good about acting against their own best interests. He sold the American people a lemon, and they drive it to this day as if it was a Cadillac. It isn't the lies that kill us, but the myths, and Ronald Reagan was the greatest myth-maker we are ever likely to see.

Mainstream media journalism today is a shameful joke because of Reagan's deregulation policies. Once upon a time, the Fairness Doctrine ensured that the information we receive - information vital to the ability of the people to govern in the manner intended - came from a wide variety of sources and perspectives. Reagan's policies annihilated the Fairness Doctrine, opening the door for a few mega-corporations to gather journalism unto themselves. Today, Reagan's old bosses at General Electric own three of the most-watched news channels. This company profits from every war we fight, but somehow is trusted to tell the truths of war.

Thus, the myths are sold to us.


The deregulation policies of Ronald Reagan did not just deliver journalism to these massive corporations, but handed virtually every facet of our lives into the hands of this privileged few. The air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat are all tainted because Reagan battered down every environmental regulation he came across so corporations could improve their bottom line.

Our leaders are wholly-owned subsidiaries of the corporations that were made all-powerful by Reagan's deregulation craze. The Savings and Loan scandal of Reagan's time, which cost the American people hundreds of billions of dollars, is but one example of Reagan's decision that the foxes would be fine guards in the henhouse.

Ronald Reagan believed in small government, despite the fact that he grew government massively during his time. Social programs which protected the weakest of our citizens were gutted by Reagan's policies, delivering millions into despair. Reagan was able to do this by caricaturing the "welfare queen," who punched out babies by the barnload, who drove the flashy car bought with your tax dollars, who refused to work because she didn't have to. This was a vicious, racist lie, one result of which was the decimation of a generation by crack cocaine. The urban poor were left to rot because Ronald Reagan believed in 'self-sufficiency.'

Because Ronald Reagan could not be bothered to fund research into 'gay cancer,' the AIDS virus was allowed to carve out a comfortable home in America. The aftershocks from this callous disregard for people whose homosexuality was deemed evil by religious conservatives cannot be overstated. Beyond the graves of those who died from a disease which was allowed to burn unchecked, there are generations of Americans today living with the subconscious idea that sex equals death.

The veneer of honor and respect painted across the legacy of Ronald Reagan is itself a myth of biblical proportions. The coverage proffered today of the Reagan legacy seldom mentions impropriety until the Iran/Contra scandal appears on the administration timeline. This sin of omission is vast. By the end of his term in office, some 138 Reagan administration officials had been convicted, indicted or investigated for misconduct and/or criminal activities.

Some of the names on this disgraceful roll-call: Oliver North, John Poindexter, Richard Secord, Casper Weinberger, Elliott Abrams, Robert C. McFarlane, Michael Deaver, E. Bob Wallach, James Watt, Alan D. Fiers, Clair George, Duane R. Clarridge, Anne Gorscuh Burford, Rita Lavelle, Richard Allen, Richard Beggs, Guy Flake, Louis Glutfrida, Edwin Gray, Max Hugel, Carlos Campbell, John Fedders, Arthur Hayes, J. Lynn Helms, Marjory Mecklenburg, Robert Nimmo, J. William Petro, Thomas C. Reed, Emanuel Savas, Charles Wick. Many of these names are lost to history, but more than a few of them are still with us today, 'rehabilitated' by the administration of George W. Bush.

Ronald Reagan actively supported the regimes of the worst people ever to walk the earth. Names like Marcos, Duarte, Rios Mont and Duvalier reek of blood and corruption, yet were embraced by the Reagan administration with passionate intensity. The ground of many nations is salted with the bones of those murdered by brutal rulers who called Reagan a friend. Who can forget his support of those in South Africa who believed apartheid was the proper way to run a civilized society?

One dictator in particular looms large across our landscape. Saddam Hussein was a creation of Ronald Reagan. The Reagan administration supported the Hussein regime despite his incredible record of atrocity. The Reagan administration gave Hussein intelligence information which helped the Iraqi military use their chemical weapons on the battlefield against Iran to great effect. The deadly bacterial agents sent to Iraq during the Reagan administration are a laundry list of horrors.

The Reagan administration sent an emissary named Donald Rumsfeld to Iraq to shake Saddam Hussein's hand and assure him that, despite public American condemnation of the use of those chemical weapons, the Reagan administration still considered him a welcome friend and ally. This happened while the Reagan administration was selling weapons to Iran, a nation notorious for its support of international terrorism, in secret and in violation of scores of laws.

Another name on Ronald Reagan's roll call is that of Osama bin Laden. The Reagan administration believed it a bully idea to organize an army of Islamic fundamentalists in Afghanistan to fight the Soviet Union. bin Laden became the spiritual leader of this action. Throughout the entirety of Reagan's term, bin Laden and his people were armed, funded and trained by the United States. Reagan helped teach Osama bin Laden the lesson he lives by today, that it is possible to bring a superpower to its knees.


bin Laden believes this because he has done it once before,
thanks to the dedicated help of Ronald Reagan.


In 1998, two American embassies in Africa were blasted into rubble by Osama bin Laden, who used the Semtex sent to Afghanistan by the Reagan administration to do the job. In 2001, Osama bin Laden thrust a dagger into the heart of the United States, using men who became skilled at the art of terrorism with the help of Ronald Reagan. Today, there are 827 American soldiers and over 10,000 civilians who have died in the invasion and occupation of Iraq, a war that came to be because Reagan helped manufacture both Saddam Hussein and Osama bin Laden.

How much of this can be truthfully laid at the feet of Ronald Reagan? It depends on who you ask. Those who worship Reagan see him as the man in charge, the man who defeated Soviet communism, the man whose vision and charisma made Americans feel good about themselves after Vietnam and the malaise of the 1970s. Those who despise Reagan see him as nothing more than a pitch-man for corporate raiders, the man who allowed greed to become a virtue, the man who smiled vapidly while allowing his officials to run the government for him.

In the final analysis, however, the legacy of Ronald Reagan - whether he had an active hand in its formulation, or was merely along for the ride - is beyond dispute. His famous question, "Are you better off now than you were four years ago?" is easy to answer. We are not better off than we were four years ago, or eight years ago, or twelve, or twenty.


We are a badly damaged state, ruled today by a man who subsists off
Reagan's most corrosive final gift to us all:
It is the image that matters,
and be damned to the truth.
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Ellyn





Joined: 16 Jul 2000
Posts: 4811
PostTue Jun 08, 2004 10:09 pm  Reply with quote  

A reader's Letter to the Editor of my local newspaper about his view of Reagan:


REAGAN THE WAR MONGER

How quickly we have forgotten what Reagan and his cohorts really did. Reagan destroyed everything he was told to destroy. Let us not forget that Reagan sold out America to Japan (our technology) in exchange for a $2 million contribution to his presidential library in Simi Valley, California. Reagan killed off the middle class in this country, along with the labor unions. Reagan was not for the people of this country anymore than is the present gang in the White House.

Through Reagan’s black-op and secret operations, tens of thousand of people were murdered not only in Latin America, but around the world. His administration was responsible for cutting funds from our veterans, as well as numerous other social programs which were beneficial the citizens of this country. Ask the Bush gang: they learned from Reagan how to gut beneficial U.S. programs.

Now we are reliving a war on TV that happened 60 years ago. Why did it take 60 years to get a memorial for World War II? The Holocaust Museum in DC is a state park which gets $35+ million annually, while funds for all the other state parks are being deeply cut. WHY? Who do our politicians really represent, and why do the American people have to pay mega-millions a year for a Jewish Holocaust museum, while our state park funds are being gutted?

The real war is here and now, and it involves this government (Scull & Bones) raping and pillaging this country financially, morally, and spiritually. The people do not count: only large corporations and the control of the people through emotional manipulation (one’s belief system, taught by society to be of value).

Wake up! $446 billion for the military to throw away? And no one is saying a word? Keep quiet and it will be $500 billion next year. There is absolutely no accountability for the distribution of these billions, so whose account do you think these billions are really going into? I do believe these taxpayer dollars could be put to a much better use for America’s infrastructure (have you driven over the roads in Spokane lately?).

Be a patriot and stand up for your rights, people, WHILE YOU CAN! That is being a PATRIOT. This government works for us; we don’t work for it! Oops! Is this a terrorist statement?

Dr. Gary Mudd
Trauma Psychology
Spokane, Washington

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