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  Health
  Our Children Are Getting Sick! (Page 2)

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Topic:   Our Children Are Getting Sick!

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KrissaTMC2
Never Surrender!


Greenwich, CT, USA
472 posts, Feb 2002

posted 02-24-2002 06:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KrissaTMC2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dan, thanks for posting that information about diabetes. while I was surfing around today, I found the latest concerning the mysterious rashes.

Filed: Thursday, February 21, 2002 6:22 PM EST


PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- Government scientists are trying to determine if mysterious rashes that have afflicted hundreds of youngsters in at least seven states are related and more widespread than previously thought.

The red, itchy rash appears to be more of an aggravation than a serious health threat, but it has temporarily closed schools, worried parents and frustrated school administrators who cannot identify its cause.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week asked health officials nationwide for information on possible outbreaks.

CDC investigators plan to interview dermatologists, pediatricians and nurses who examined the affected children, spokesman Llelwyn Grant said Thursday.

Students in Pennsylvania, Oregon, New York, West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio and Washington state have complained about rashes on their face, arms, legs and body in recent months. For the most part, the rashes go away when the students leave school.

Some health investigators suspect it might be caused by a new or yet-to-be-identified virus.

Most school districts have ruled out an environmental cause, although one Washington state district found abnormally high levels of dust, dandruff and skin particles. http://library.northernlight.com/EE20020221100000025.html?cb=0&dx=2006&sc=0#doc


CDC Investigating School Rashes

PHILADELPHIA – February 23, 2002 — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention want to know whether mysterious rashes that have afflicted hundreds of youngsters in more than a half-dozen states are somehow related – and more widespread than previously thought.
Acting on media reports, the CDC this week asked health officials in all 50 states for information on possible rash outbreaks in their schools.
"There are some CDC dermatologists and other CDC personnel who are looking at the various rashes to see if there are some commonalties," agency spokeswoman Rhonda Smith said Thursday.

Students in Pennsylvania, Oregon, New York, West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio and Washington state have complained about rashes on the face, arms, legs and body in recent months. For the most part, the rashes go away when the students leave school.

So far, CDC has heard back from officials in Oregon, Indiana, New York, Georgia, Virginia and Pennsylvania, said spokesman Llelwyn Grant.

CDC investigators plan to interview dermatologists, pediatricians and nurses who examined the affected children, he said.

Some health investigators suspect some of the rashes might be caused by a new or yet-to-be-identified virus. Most school systems have ruled out an environmental cause, although a school district in Washington state found abnormally high levels of dust, dandruff and skin particles.

The red, itchy rash has temporarily closed schools, worried parents and frustrated school administrators.

In the Quakertown Community School District in suburban Philadelphia, nearly 200 students developed rashes at all nine schools. Test results came back negative this week for bacteria, mold and spider mites.

"All environmental test results have been completed. All are negative," the school district reported on its Web site.

Georgia and Indiana both told CDC about minor outbreaks.

In October, 17 students at Waverly Elementary School in Waverly, Ind., developed rashes. Yet by the time state health investigators got to the school, the rashes were gone. A cause was never found.

"Their little faces were so smooth when (workers) got there," said Margaret Joseph, spokeswoman for the Indiana Department of Health.

In Georgia, "there was one situation in a school that passed rather quickly and didn't effect a lot of people," said Barbara Joye, spokeswoman for the Division of Public Health. Nevertheless, the CDC "asked that people in the states cite anything that might be related.

Grant said the Georgia case involved one student who came down with eczema – a common skin condition – followed by two or three other students who exhibited phantom symptoms. http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/news/print_02232002_nw_cdcrash.html


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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 02-26-2002 01:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the post Krissa.

Not sure if I posted this story before, but I have found one story dated January 24, 2002 concerning a mysterious rash.

Jan 24, 2002
Mysterious Rash
Jennifer Atchison
WKRG 5
Health officials are trying to figure out what is causing a strange rash on students and teachers at a Mobile County elementary school. Around 25 students and two teachers have gotten the rash at Collier Elementary School. The Mobile County Health Department says the rash isn't infectious, so it isn't being passed from person to person. Instead, health officials are looking to the air system, and other facility structures to find out what's causing it. Doctors don't think the rash is serious. This story can be found at : http://www.wkrg.com/news/MGBWOVK8VWC.html

Here are the latest stories concerning the mysterious rash. And yes, Connecticut has been affected too.


Mysterious Rash at Connecticut School
Feb. 23, 2002 6:23 am
(Prospect-AP) -- Officials at Community School canceled classes today after about two dozen fourth graders broke out in a mysterious rash.

Nearly 20 fourth graders from the same classroom developed a red, itchy rash Wednesday after they had all been outside.
That's according to Superintendent Helene Skrzyniarz in the Waterbury Republican-American.
Officials say that seven more fourth graders went to the nurse Thursday with the rashes, which were generally on exposed areas.
Students in Pennsylvania, Oregon, New York, West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio and Washington state have complained about rashes on their face, arms, legs and body in recent months. For the most part, the rashes go away when the students leave school.
Some health investigators suspect it might be caused by a new or yet-to-be-identified virus. School will reopen on Monday. http://1010wins.com/StoryFolder/story_1586578953_html/index_html


Back to school after mysterious rash

It was back to school for most of the 245 students at Community School; 13 stayed home sick, only one of those for reports of a rash-like symptom.
And no news, says the area's health director, is good news when it comes to this mysterious rash. While no new cases appeared here, the school nurse did take calls from colleagues at schools in nearby Naugatuck, Wolcott and Region 15, which includes Middlebury and Southbury. But nothing has turned up to indicate the rash may be spreading.
Tom Wegrzyn/Health Director: "It's described as a rash-like condition, red rash, some cases doesn't present itself as anything but a benign illness."
To be sure, the Community School was closed and cleaned late last week after 30 fourth-graders and one teacher reported similar conditions. While most parents said they were relieved, Sue Farrar was concerned about her family: "I'm nervous about going in there."
While the rash appears to be subsiding, investigators can now get down to the issue at hand, how this started.
In Prospect, Andrew Pergam, Channel 3, Eyewitness News http://www.wfsb.com/global/Frameset.asp?P=/default.asp?FramesetID=1

AND WHEN YOU THOUGHT IT WAS SAFE TO GO BACK TO SCHOOL...

Mystery Rash Strikes Sheridan School Again
February 25, 2002, 05:15 PM
By Jim Parker and Krista Vasquez, KGW Staff

Sheridan's Chapman Elementary School was shut down again Monday afternoon after 35 students and staff reported breakouts from a mysterious rash for a second time.

Local health officials said the school would remain closed until further notice, cancelling classes for at least Tuesday and possibly longer.

The school's heating and cooling system will be thouroughly cleaned on Tuesday, as experts struggle to determine what may have triggered the mysterious rash.

"We'd really like to get back to educating, rather than chasing bugs," said principal Tim Graham.

Students began reporting itchy skin irritations about 9 a.m. Monday, school officials said. Some of the students affcted were the same ones who reported experiencing the rash on Thursday -- the last time school was in session. Two staff members also reported having the rash Monday, officials said.

Graham said the children were bussed home at 1:20 p.m. because of this latest outbreak.

State health officials still have more questions than answers about the mysterious rash that has struck the school in Sheridan.

Graham said his school's mysterious rash does not follow the pattern of other schools where the rash disappeared within a few hours and did not reappear.

The state epidemiologist said there were no other reports of mystery rash outbreaks in Oregon on Monday.

Chapman school was first closed Friday after 58 elementary students and four adults reported the rash on their arms and legs a day earlier. Earlier this month, 55 children and ten adults reported what appeared to be a similar rash in Medford.

Health officials are trying to figure out whether there's a link between the Oregon rash outbreaks, as well as whether the rashes are related to outbreaks reported in Washington, Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia, Virginia and Ohio.
(The Associated Press contributed to his report.) http://www.kgw.com/elements/emailstory_confirm.html



[Edited 1 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 02-26-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 02-27-2002 11:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's some more information about the mysterious rash.

Posted on Fri, Feb. 22, 2002

One man's search for cause of rash that's itching pupils
By Peter Sigal
Inquirer Staff Writer

Desiree Mitchell doesn't want to be in a dermatologist's office on a weekday morning, listening to talk of scratch tests, skin samples and throat washes.The 11-year-old with green sparkles in her hair would rather be with her fifth-grade class at Richland Elementary School in Quakertown. But the itchy, burning rash she has had since Jan. 31 will not go away.So she submits, grudgingly, to the tests that Dr. Norman L. Sykes has arranged in his quest to explain the mysterious rashes that have afflicted hundreds of schoolchildren in the Philadelphia area - and similar numbers nationwide.After initial environmental tests at the schools came up empty, hospital officials called in Sykes, who has been searching for a viral cause ever since.

Locally, the rash was first seen in Quakertown on Jan. 31, when 52 students at Richland Elementary were rushed to the emergency room at St. Luke's Quakertown Hospital. Since then, it has hit the Spring-Ford, Bensalem and Pottsgrove districts.From dozens of new cases a day at the height of the outbreak, reports have slowed to a trickle, officials say. Overall, at least 400 suburban students have been affected.The rashes - symptoms include red patches on cheeks, necks, arms and legs often accompanied by burning and itching - have also appeared in schools in Queens, N.Y.; Prince William County, Va.; and Medford, Ore., in the last few months.

Sykes said he believes, after talking with officials in those places, that the outbreaks have a common cause."This situation is unprecedented, in that it seems to be an epidemic," Sykes said Wednesday in his Elkins Park office. "We see the same thing, over and over again, in different parts of the country."The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has begun contacting state officials, dermatologists and pediatricians to try to determine whether the rashes are related, an agency spokesman said yesterday.

Officials in Bucks and Montgomery Counties initially suspected an environmental culprit. A range of factors - mold, mites, carpet cleaner, even cafeteria pizza - were tested. All have since been rejected as causes.On Feb. 5, St. Luke's Quakertown Hospital called in Sykes, 44, an attending physician there and a professor at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. The next day, he examined about 30 children there - and the hunt for a virus was on.

Though health effects have been mild, Sykes acknowledged that the rash's spread raises the question of what would happen if a dangerous virus were deliberately unleashed.In his search for a cause of the rash, he has focused on fifth disease, also known as erythema infectiosum, a contagious childhood illness with symptoms like those the affected students have. Although he hasn't established a conclusive link to fifth disease, he said he suspected that a mutant or unknown strain of the virus that causes it may be responsible."We have to do everything in our power to figure out what this is, not only to know what it is, but also to learn more about how to deal with viruses," Sykes said.Sykes gives Desiree a cup of liquid to gargle. He will send the sample to a colleague at Jefferson to see whether any known viruses can be cultured. "Yuck," Desiree says, making a face that echoes the point after swishing stoically for a few seconds. But the next test - collecting a skin sample - breaks down her resistance."Stitches!" she wails. "Just one," Sykes promises.In five minutes, the procedure is over. The tiny skin patch will go to George F. Murphy, director of Jefferson's Center for Dermatopathology, which studies skin diseases. He will scan micron-thin slices of it with an electron microscope, magnifying them up to 100,000 times for evidence of viruses.

"I think [Sykes'] idea that this could be some type of unrecognized disease . . . is an excellent one," said Murphy, who has worked with Sykes before on diagnosing skin disease.Sykes' latest tests, using the samples he obtained from Desiree, will take weeks. And, he acknowledged, the cause may never be found."Since February 6, I've been living with this epidemic virtually 24 hours a day," he said. "I've been getting little sleep, waking up at night thinking, 'We should have done this. We should have done that.' "Sykes' chose to pursue dermatology, which he calls a "quiet specialty," after a personal tragedy.As an 8-year-old in Roxborough, he wanted to be a doctor, but as so often happens, that desire gave way to other dreams.

Sykes, a graduate of the Penn Charter School, took a liking to science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he earned a degree in population biology.In his mid-20s, he was working as an immunology researcher when his mother contracted a virulent form of melanoma. Within four months, the skin cancer had killed her, and Sykes, impressed by the doctors who treated her, had found a new career focus. At age 27, he entered Jefferson.The rashes - and the recent anthrax scare - have turned the national media spotlight on dermatology.

Sykes said he hoped the publicity would help bring more researchers and physicians into the hunt. "I'm sort of the public figure in this thing, but I'm not trying to do everything myself," he said. "I see myself as a catalyst to stimulate other people to figure out what's going on." http://www.philly.com/mld/philly/living/health/2723007.htm


Mystery rash closes school indefinitely
Monday, February 25,2002

SHERIDAN - The mystery rash plaguing students and staff at Sheridan's Chapman Elementary School returned Monday, sending students home and closing the school indefinitely. Many students walked home, others were bussed home at approximately 1:30 p.m. today. Apparently, although in some cases the rash subsided after the students went home for the weekend, many of those same students experienced a rash flare-up upon returning to classes. The Health Department and a hazardous materials crew will conduct environmental tests in an effort to determine the origin. The cause of the rash remains baffling because investigators have been unable to pinpoint any common thread linking the cases. Eighty percent of the cases have affected female students. The school had reopened earlier today. The school was closed Friday after 58 elementary students and four adults reported the rash on their arms and legs a day earlier. Earlier this month, 55 children and ten adults reported what appeared to be a similar rash in Medford. Health officials are trying to figure out whether there's a link between the two rash outbreaks, as well as whether the rashes are related to outbreaks reported in Washington, Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia, Virginia and Ohio. http://www.oregonlive.com/news/katu/index.ssf?/news/fullstory_breakingnews.html





[Edited 3 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 02-27-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-01-2002 12:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mysterious Rash Disappears Quickly
February 27, 2002
By WILLIAM HATHAWAY, Courant Staff Writer

The mysterious rash that appeared on the bodies of about two dozen fourth-graders at Community School in Prospect last week has disappeared as quickly as it arrived.

The apparently harmless rash has health officials scratching their heads in Connecticut, as well as in 10 other states where similar cases have been reported since last November.

"It appears to be benign, and it also seems to have gone away," said Thomas J. Wegryzn, director of health for the Chesprocott Health District, which serves Cheshire, Prospect and Wolcott.

Wegryzn said district health officials went to the school Thursday, after school nurses reported that for the second day fourth-grade students were complaining of rashes.

While health officials were there, he said, more fourth-graders showed up with rashes on their face, neck or torso. None of the children had a fever, and the rash was gone within 24 hours, he said.

The 25 to 30 children who reported rashes all came from four of the five fourth-grade classes located in the first floor wing of the school, Wegryzn said. Other children among the approximately 100 students in the wing did not come down with the rash.

The school was closed Friday and reopened on Monday.

An inspection of the building and interviews with students revealed no obvious environmental suspect that might have caused the rash. Wegryzn noted that the rash appeared not only on exposed areas of skin, but under shirts as well.

One theory is that the children had been exposed to some sort of virus. However, he said, there have been no reports of similar rashes among the affected students' siblings.

The outbreak was similar to a case reported in Sheriden, Ore., where about 35 elementary school students developed a rash over two days. In other reported cases, officials said the rash appeared on a single day and disappeared within a couple of hours. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said rashes have been reported by health officials or the media in Washington, Pennsylvania, New York, West Virginia, Virginia, Indiana, Florida, Georgia and Ohio. CDC officials said no cause for the rash has been identified in any of those cases. http://mv.ctnow.com/news/health/hc-rash0227.artfeb27.story?coll=hc%2Dheadlines%2Dhealth


CDC: Rash outbreaks not linked
February 28, 2002

ATLANTA, Georgia (AP) --A national study of recent rash outbreaks in school children has found no common cause, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Thursday.Fourteen states have reported some type of rash outbreak since October, most often among elementary school children who complained of mysterious rashes on their faces, arms, legs and bodies. The outbreaks have affected anywhere from 10 to 600 people at a time.In Pennsylvania, an outbreak of red, itchy rashes at five schools worried parents and temporarily closed some schools. A Connecticut school also closed for one day to clean air filters after children developed rashes.The CDC requested reports from all 50 states about any rash outbreaks but found no common cause for the rashes and said the rashes weren't all the same."With 53 million young people attending 117,000 schools every day in the United States, it is expected that rashes from a wide variety of causes will be observed," the study concluded.Researchers said further study is needed because many of the outbreaks have unexplained causes, even after interviewing doctors who treated the rashes and doing environmental studies of the schools that had outbreaks.Rash outbreaks were reported in Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Mississippi, New York, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, Washington and West Virginia.Most of the rashes went away in less than two weeks.
http://www.cnn.com/virtual/editions/europe/2000/roof/change.pop/frameset.exclude.html



[Edited 3 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 03-01-2002]

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KrissaTMC2
Never Surrender!


Greenwich, CT, USA
472 posts, Feb 2002

posted 03-01-2002 09:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KrissaTMC2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dan, I did a little searching around to see if there were any mentions of any mysterious rash cases in the UK and I found one.

Mysterious rash closes a Prince William County school
November 28, 2001 -- Marsteller Middle School will be closed to students Wednesday, though faculty and staff were told to report to work. Four staff members and 114 students have been infected and despite the best efforts of school and health officials, they're at a loss as to just what it is. School officials said they have swept every inch of the school looking for a cause. The outbreak began last Tuesday when 20 cases were reported and it has continued to grow. Tuesday, more students left school with the mysterious rash. The rash first appears first as individual bumps. School officials said it's not a crisis but there is concern. Associate school superintendent said, We are looking at any medical or environmental possibilities although as Mrs. Poindexter stated all the test have come back negative so far.
http://www.google.com/search?q=cache:KmAfG_DuhU0C:www.watchmanjo urnal.org/outbreaks.html+mysterious+rash&hl=en

Now I'm beginning to wonder what they've been doing since November of 2001 that they weren't doing before. That seems to be the time when the first of the rash cases were reported. Any Ideas?


[Edited 1 times, lastly by KrissaTMC2 on 03-01-2002]

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Hoople
Senior Member


Charleston, Ar
167 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-06-2002 11:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hoople     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a "gut feeling" on the source of these rashes in school children. I sense that this outbreak of rasshes in all of these children in so many schools in, I think - 13 or 14 states now, is tied to the food chain. I suspect that there is a common denominator in what these children have been eating in their school cafeterias and if those investigating would start looking in that direction I wouldn't be at all surprised if they eventually came up with a common item which was being consumed by all of these children who have the rash. This rash could very well be the manifestation of some side effect brought on by some GMO (genetically modified organism)ie., corn, soy, beans, potatoes, milk - to name a few. I do not think it is chemtrail related.

I also think that if this was discovered or maybe already has been discovered, that the news would never get out. TPTB have not only got the control of mainstream media but they've got our food chain in their control too.

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KrissaTMC2
Never Surrender!


Greenwich, CT, USA
472 posts, Feb 2002

posted 03-14-2002 05:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KrissaTMC2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You might be right Hoople, I have read about some food additives in the UK that were banned because they caused rashes and severe allergic reactions. I'll see what I can find.

Fresh from the AP. Something else to worry about.

Today: March 14, 2002 at 15:45:20 PST

Pink Eye Outbreaks at Two Universities
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) - Hundreds of students at Dartmouth College and Princeton University have contracted pink eye infections, and experts fear the outbreak could spread during spring breaks.

More than 250 Princeton students have reported symptoms of conjunctivitis since officials began tracking the infections last month.

At Dartmouth, the number is nearing 500, and another 500 students may have had the infection and not reported it, said Dr. Jack Turco of Dartmouth's student health center.

That number is at least five times higher than usual, and the rate isn't easing as students leave this week for spring break, Turco said.

"Some students are just developing pink eye now. There is a possibility it will blossom in the different places they go during their break," Turco said. He urged other schools to watch for signs of the infection.

Pink eye can cause a pink or red discoloration of the eyes, irritation, swelling, blurry vision, sticky eyelids and increased sensitivity to light.

The infection, which can be treated by antibiotic ointment, typically lasts three to four days and is most often caused by a virus and accompanied by a cold.

However, the Dartmouth outbreak is bacterial and spreads quickly, and that has drawn attention of scientists, Turco said. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and New Hampshire health officials were expected to report their findings Friday.

"This is not a serious illness, but if some of the properties of this bacteria were transferred to a more dangerous bacteria, that would be dangerous," Turco said.

Tests are being conducted to determine if the outbreak at Princeton is bacterial or viral and whether the outbreaks are related.

The Princeton outbreak represents about double what is normally reported there, said Janet A. Neglia of Princeton University Health Services.

Pink eye is spread through eye secretions, hands and breath. Students were warned to avoid sharing towels or drinking glasses and to wash their hands frequently.

Officials said the outbreaks could be connected because students travel between the Ivy League campuses to visit friends and their sports teams have competed in recent weeks.

Spring break could help reduce the infections at the campuses, said New Hampshire epidemiologist Dr. Jesse Greenblatt. "The close living conditions won't exist (over the break)," he said.
-- http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/thrive/2002/mar/14/031404683.html


[Edited 1 times, lastly by KrissaTMC2 on 03-14-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-15-2002 12:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I heard something about certain food additives causing rashes in the UK and here in the States, there is a snowballing controversy surrounding aspertame. Some people say it's safe and others say it's a poison. Of course aspertame is supposedly produced by Monsanto so there could be something to the claims of its toxicity. I personally know people who get severe headaches whenever they eat or drink anything that contains the additive and I wouldn't be surprised if it causes more problems with other people.

BTW Krissa, thanks for posting the article about the pinkeye outbreak. There seems to be something real suspicious about it, but haven't seen enough data on it to be sure.

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-16-2002 12:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mystery rash affects 70 at Harwinton school
By ANDREW BLEJWAS, Special to the Bristol Press March 15, 2002

HARWINTON -- Health department officials are saying there is no need to panic after 70 students at Harwinton Consolidated School contracted a rash that led to the decision to cancel school today.
The rash, similar to others reported elsewhere in Connecticut and throughout the nation, developed quickly, Region 10 Superintendent Evan Pitkoff said Thursday.

"It had a quick onset and the number of cases climbed to 70 by the end of the day," Pitkoff said.

Both the Torrington Area Health District and the Connecticut Department of Public Health were called in to investigate the outbreak, with the Torrington health district handling the investigation. The elementary school primarily serves Harwinton, but about 100 students who live in Burlington attend the school.

While the health department did not mandate the school closing, Pitkoff said he and other officials determined closing the building for a day to give the health district three days to investigate was the proper decision.

The first reports of an infection came in at approximately 11:30 a.m., Pitkoff said. The reports began with fourth-graders but quickly expanded to other grades.

The affected students were sent home Thursday and will not be permitted to return to school until they have received clearance from a medical doctor, preferably a dermatologist, Pitkoff said.

This is not the first mysterious rash to hit Connecticut or the nation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports similar incidents in 14 states, including Indiana, Mississippi, Oregon and Georgia, in addition to another outbreak in Connecticut.

The first reported incident occurred in Indiana on Oct. 4. That report was followed by others in Virginia and still more in January and February.

The rashes have been primarily reported in elementary school students, although there have been some rashes among a few middle and high school students and a number of teachers.

Characteristics of the various rashes vary, but generally occur on the face, neck, hands, or arms. The duration of the rash differs from person to person, but can last anywhere between 24 hours and two weeks.

Officials are investigating the cause of the rash outbreaks, though diagnoses thus far have included eczema, chemical exposure and poison ivy. Fifth disease has also been blamed in several cases.

Pitkoff said in a note sent home to parents that the health district will investigate the matter further and advise school officials if any additional actions are necessary.

He said the school is expected to reopen on Monday.
_______________________________________________________

I also found something quite by accident while I was looking for this latest rash story that I thought was kind of interesting concerning some broad spectrum antibiotics.


What is ciprofloxacin?
Ciprofloxacin is a broad-spectrum antibiotic agent active against several bacteria. The use of ciprofloxacin is warranted only under the supervision of a physician. Ciprofloxacin is one antibiotic often recommended to prevent anthrax after a person has been exposed to B. anthracis.

What are the side effects of ciprofloxacin?
Ciprofloxacin is a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone indicated for use in reducing the incidence or progression of inhalational anthrax. Adverse health effects include vomiting, diarrhea, headaches, dizziness, sun sensitivity and rash. CNS effects occur in <1% of patients and may be accentuated by caffeine or theophylline-containing medications

What is doxycycline?
Doxycycline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic agent active against several bacteria. The use of doxycycline is warranted only under the supervision of a physician. Doxycycline is one antibiotic often recommended to prevent anthrax after a person has been exposed to B. anthracis.

What are the side effects of doxycycline?
Adverse side effects may include nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea; sensitivity to the sun; dark “furry” tongue, black tongue, or swollen tongue; or vaginal yeast infection. Serious side effects may include an allergic reaction (swelling of your lips, face, or tongue, difficulty breathing); a severe headache; vision changes; confusion; liver damage (yellowing of the skin or eyes, nausea, abdominal pain or discomfort, unusual bleeding or bruising, severe fatigue); blood problems (fever, fatigue, easy bruising or bleeding); or genital sores or itching.

What are the risks of using tetracyclines and fluoroquinolones in children,
and are alternatives available?
Both agents can have adverse health reactions in children. These risks must be weighed carefully against the risk for developing a life-threatening disease due to B. Anthracis. If adverse reactions are suspected, physicians may recommend alternative therapies.
http://www.chime.org/whatsnew.asp


[Edited 5 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 03-16-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-22-2002 01:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just when you thought that we have seen the last of the mysterious rash, more cases pop up. Thermit posted the link to this story on another thread.

Rashes Send Phila. Schoolkids Home
Friday, March 22, 2002

PHILADELPHIA (AP) - An outbreak of mysterious rashes among schoolchildren continued here this week, with about 60 youngsters sent home with itchy, pink blotches.The rashes on the students' arms and necks surfaced nearly two months after hundreds of students in the area complained of similar rashes. Since October, 14 states have reported outbreaks of unexplained rashes affecting 10 to 600 people at a time.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found no common cause for the outbreaks.About 34 students at Mast Community Charter School in northeast Philadelphia reported the rash Wednesday and were sent home. Another 26 were sent home Thursday, said Karen Delguercio, president of the school's board of trustees.The school sent letters to parents of nearly 1,000 students explaining the problem.``What the Health Department told us is that it appeared to be a viral infection similar to this mystery rash that's going around,'' Delguercio said.Similar rashes closed two Pennsylvania elementary schools and an intermediate school in early February.
http://webcenter.newssearch.netscape.com/aolns_display.adp?key=200203221127000112718_aolns.src

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Dan Rockwell
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Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-26-2002 03:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
3/23/02
The Lewiston Sun Journal

Phillips school closed again after more rashes

The Phillips Middle School was closed Friday for the second time this week to undergo a thorough cleaning after more children broke out with mystery rashes on exposed skin Thursday. Health officials have categorized the rashes as contact dermatitis.

About 50 students of the 120 in grades three through eight complained of a red, itchy rash on arms, faces and other exposed skin on Tuesday. No adults reported rashes. The school was closed Wednesday for a thorough airing and cleaning.

Mount Abram Regional Health Center's staff, including a physician, were at the school Thursday to check out those who still had rashes.

About 20 kids still had the rash Thursday, SAD 58 Superintendent Quenten Clark said, and a handful of new cases were reported with some siblings also reporting rashes.

The state recommended the school be shut down again Friday, he said, for more cleaning and to let the rash run its course.

Clark said he has checked with school superintendents from around the country to see what they were doing about the outbreak of mysterious rashes.

The Phillips school is the first in Maine reporting an unexplained rash. Fourteen other states have reported schoolchildren breaking out in rashes since October, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, Ga.

Clark said the superintendents indicated that the rash disappears within a week.

The rash reported at the Phillips school is not like chicken pox, Clark said; it is much less intense than that and has no pustules.

"What's interesting," he said, "is how fast the rash appears."

Carolyn Tranten, manager of the Kingfield health center, said Friday that health officials at the center have diagnosed the rashes as being caused by contact dermatitis, which means the children's skin has come in contact with an allergen and they came down with a rash.

"We believe there is some allergen in the school, but that has not been confirmed by the state," Tranten said. The state is looking into testing, deputy director of the State Bureau of Health, Dr. Phil Haines, said.

"We still don't know the cause," he said. But health officials don't believe the rash is dangerous, threatening or infectious, he said, but it has not ruled out environmental causes.

The environmental inspector who came to school Wednesday was not available Friday, Haines said.

Clark said the consultant wanted $5,000 before he took his equipment out of his vehicle, and his district does not have that kind of money in its budget. What concerned him, Clark said, is that the state doesn't have a plan to deal with this type of situation. But state authorities maintain they do have a plan and have put it into action.

Clark reaffirmed Friday that SAD 58 would not be paying for the environmental testing. Haines said the state is looking into payment for the testing.

Clark said he had a 100 percent cure rate Thursday with children. He took a group of students itching with the rash and gave them some pizza and put on the video "Shrek," and for 90 minutes no one itched, Clark said.
http://www.sunjournal.com/story.asp?slg=032302rash

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Dan Rockwell
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Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-26-2002 03:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As I have mentioned, earlier on in this thread, I have ruled out the following as the cause of this mysterious rash:

chickenpox, varicella, measles, rubella, German measles, scarlet fever, scarlatina, forth disease,fifth disease, sixth disease, erythema infectiosum, slapped cheeks disease, roseola infantum, exanthem subitum, coxsackieviruses, enteroviruses, impetigo, petechiae, petechia, meningococcemia, meningococcal sepsis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, RMSF, Lyme disease, Kawasaki disease, mucocutaneous lymph node syndrome, toxic shock syndrome, TSS, streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, STSS, scabies, ringworm, athlete’s foot, seborrheic dermatitis, cradle cap, milia, infantile acne, erythema toxicum, miliaria, prickly heat, candidal rash, yeast infection, seborrheic dermatitis, irritant diaper rash.

However, I cannot rule out the use of a ciprofloxacin or doxycycline type of chemical administered in the form of a spray with a DSMO type base. However, no such chemical residue has been found as far as we know. - And so we are left with a mysterious rash that may pop up several more times.

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XtromatriX
New Member


Baltimore MD
14 posts, Feb 2002

posted 03-27-2002 08:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for XtromatriX     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The rash is her in MD now, I don't know how long it's been happening here but I first heard about it in our local news yesterday. Here is the link. http://www.wjz.com/now/story/0,1597,331940-367,00.shtml

------------------
Those that will tell dont know, and those that know wont tell.

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David
Chemtrail Information Agent


1280 posts, Oct 2000

posted 03-27-2002 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It's not just the children, adults are now coming down with the mystery rash.

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-27-2002 12:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I know all about that, but it is kind of unusual that very few of these reports have not mentioned that fact and are trying very hard to blame it on something that the children are coming in contact with in the schools.

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-27-2002 12:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for the update XtromatriX.

Mysterious Rash in Cecil County School

Wednesday, March 27, 2002 - 08:12 AM ET

(WJZ) Perryville Middle School is sending home letters about a mysterious rash that sent 34 students home last week. State health officials say the rash does not appear to be dangerous, but they don't know what it is or how it's being spread. Schools in Talbot and Allegany counties have also reported a handful of cases in recent weeks and there are reports of outbreaks in more than a dozen states. Cecil County School officials say the Perryville students had red bumps on their inner arms with itching and irritation. They are all fine and have returned to school. The state health department still plans to investigate and will send questionnaires to some of the students who had the rash. http://www.wjz.com/now/story/0,1597,331940-367,00.shtml

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KrissaTMC2
Never Surrender!


Greenwich, CT, USA
472 posts, Feb 2002

posted 03-27-2002 05:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KrissaTMC2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Measles outbreak in Jutland

January 29, 2002 -- Within the past 4 weeks, 7 cases of measles have been reported from a limited geographical area of northern Jutland in non-immunized children between 2 and 11 years old. The immunization coverage in children below 2 years is 84 percent and in children 11-17 years old 90 percent. The authorities fear a beginning of an outbreak and have urged parents to ensure that their children are immunized. Press reports today indicate a run on doctors´offices from anxious parents who want their children to be immunized. http://www.watchmanjournal.org/outbreaks.html#176

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-27-2002 11:28 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's another story concerning the mysterious rash cases in Maryland.


Mysterious Rash Hits Maryland Students
Officials Say No Other Symptoms Detected
Updated: 4:38 p.m. EST March 26, 2002

A skin rash affecting young children across the nation has shown up in Maryland.

Forty-five children at Perryville Middle School in Perryville, Md., were treated for the mysterious rash and several of them were sent home last week.

Health officials say the itching can last a few hours to two weeks. They say there is normally no fever associated with the condition, which is popping up among younger children.

School officials aren't sure what caused the rash. However, they said there are no other medical symptoms related to the rash outbreak to make them think it could be an infectious disease.

State officials say the same sort of rash has been showing up in school districts in 17 other states.

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a report about 14 states that had reported investigations of schoolchildren who developed rashes between October 2001 and February 2002.
http://www.thehawaiichannel.com/sh/health/stories/health-132697820020326-150340.htm


And here is the latest news in from Canada.


N.S. school closed due to skin rash
Canadian Press
Wednesday, March 27, 2002 – Print Edition, Page A7

BARRINGTON, N.S. -- The local high school has been closed and students sent home after an outbreak of a mysterious rash among Grade 7 students.

On Monday and late last week, students came down with a skin condition at Barrington municipal high school in southwestern Nova Scotia. Heather Burlingham, a spokeswoman for the Tri-County school district, said the rash affects exposed skin.

"It started the latter part of last week and as of Friday about 45 students in the junior
section were affected," she said.

School board officials said air-quality tests haven't found any problem with the school, which has 680 students.


Students sent home from Nova Scotia school after outbreak of mystery rash
March 26, 2002
BARRINGTON, N.S. (CP) -- The local high school has been closed and students sent home until Tuesday after an outbreak of a mysterious rash among Grade 7 students.
On Monday and late last week, students came down with a skin condition at Barrington municipal high school in southwestern Nova Scotia.

Heather Burlingham, a spokeswoman for the Tri-County school district, said the rash affects exposed skin. "It started the later part of last week and as of Friday about 45 students in the junior section were
affected," she said.

Burlingham said the rash was contained in the junior section of the school. She said the section has been washed down and some carpeting was removed.

School board officials said so far air
quality tests haven't found any problem with the school, which has a total of 680 students. The Health Department has told the school board that the rash isn't life threatening. http://www.canoe.ca/AtlanticTicker/CANOE-wire.NS-School-Rash.html



[Edited 4 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 03-27-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-28-2002 12:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No cause discovered for rash in Phillips
By BETTY JESPERSEN Staff Writer
Tuesday, March 26, 2002

PHILLIPS -- The search continues in Phillips for the cause of the mysterious itching rash that closed the school for two days last week.

On Monday, an indoor environmental expert from the state Bureau of General Services was at Phillips Middle School to look at ceiling tiles and carpeting, and brought back air-filters and vacuum cleaner bags used during fumigation for possible lab analysis.

"The rash has faded away. Everything is back to normal," Superintendent Quenten Clark of School Administrative District 58 said Monday.

According the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, 14 states have reported investigations of school children who developed short-lived rashes since last October. Characteristics vary but the onset is marked by severe itching on the face, neck, hands or arms. There are no other symptoms and the condition lasts from a few hours to two weeks.

Phillips Middle School is the only one in Maine to report such a rash outbreak. Maine's Bureau of Health, along with health agencies from other states, is working with the CDC to find a common cause but so far, there does not seem to be one, said Dr. Philip Haines, the state's deputy health director.

"We are in regular contact with the CDC, and while there are many outbreaks of rashes, they are not all the same," he said. "We are asking parents to fill out a questionnaire and we have a few blood samples taken by medical practitioners last week that we will test if the CDC requests it."

Under state Department of Education guidelines, schools are responsible for dealing with local medical concerns, Haines said. If the condition had continued to spread and worsen, there would have been an immediate state response and remediation costs incurred by the district would be reimbursed.

"We feel that is a responsible approach for something that did not appear to be life-theatening and is self-limiting," he said.

Clark said he was amazed to learn of the scope of rash problems across the nation but he said he got more information from a superintendent from Erie, Pa., than he got from health officials in Maine.

"It was a small rash, so insignificant you would never go to a doctor if you got it. Probably a thousand kids have a rash like this around Maine on any given day. But when you have a lot of kids coming down with it at the same time, you need a plan on the shelf, a fact sheet, to tell someone like me what to do immediately and what to tell parents," he said.

Clark said school officials used common sense when they segregated the children, sent them home on separate buses,disinfected and cleaned the classrooms, collected air filters and cleaning bags in plastic bags, and closed the school. But he worried about serious allergic reactions that can start with a rash.

"This was not a horrible thing, but it should be a wake-up call. I had expected the state's medical SWAT team to come up to take a look, or have someone take skin scrapings or at least tell us that the kids should wash their hands," Clark said.
http://www.centralmaine.com/news/stories/020326phillips.shtml



[Edited 1 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 03-28-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
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Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-31-2002 01:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mystery rash shuts Wixon school

Similar outbreaks have been seen among students in 14 states since October.
By K.C. MYERS
STAFF WRITER

DENNIS - The outbreak of a mysterious rash among middle school students caused officials to order Nathaniel Wixon Middle School closed for today.

Yesterday, 48 of the school's 725 students reported having a red and itchy rash. It appears to be the same rash that has baffled school and health officials in 14 states since the fall. The Wixon school outbreak may be the first reported case in Massachusetts.

The rash appears as small, red hives. Although it is itchy, it apparently poses no serious health threat, according to officials from both the state and Barnstable County Department of Health. Still, no one knows what causes the rash or how it is spread, said Stetson Hall, director of the county board of health."It's just so frustrating. No one has any information," said Dennis-Yarmouth Schools Supt. Tony Pierantozzi. "That's why I decided to close the school."While the Wixon school is closed, county health workers will clean all desks and surfaces with antiseptic. Health officials also will check the school's air quality. There are two rooms that seem to be particular "hot spots," Pierantozzi said. He did not identify the rooms.A seventh-grade girl was the first to report the rash on Tuesday, Hall said.

Yesterday, principal Patricia Fitzsimmons told the Barnstable County Department of Health the rash was spreading. Besides the 48 who reported the rash at school yesterday, 60 students were absent, Pierantozzi said."The numbers were going up and down, but today we realized it was just getting worse," he said.County health officials called the state health department. Officials there did not mention any other schools in the state with an outbreak, Hall said."I assume this may be the first in the state," he said.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta reported on March 1 that schools in 14 states - the closest being Connecticut - have reported this type of rash since October 2001.

The rash affects schoolchildren in various numbers, from fewer than 10 cases to more than 600 in one school. The outbreaks are usually in elementary schools, but have been seen in some middle and high schools, the CDC reports. It does not make the students seriously ill. The cases can last from a few hours to two weeks, the CDC states.

Only schools affected

So far, the rash doesn't appear to have spread in any other institution besides schools, Hall said. Places of employment where adults work in close contact don't seem to be affected, he said. While some teachers and school staff have come down with the rash in schools, parents and siblings have rarely been infected.

That has led investigators to believe that the mode of transmission comes from the school environment itself, rather than being passed from person to person.

Diane Clark, a Cape Cod Times employee, said her son, a seventh-grader at Wixon, has contracted the same rash twice. The first time was last Wednesday, when it appeared on his cheek. Yesterday, he woke up with it on his chest, his mother said."It looks like poison ivy," she said. "It's red and bumpy."She said the rash disappeared overnight the first time. Yesterday it faded as the day progressed.Some medical officials have started labeling the rash "viral adolescence hives," Pierantozzi said. Since school is to be closed tomorrow for Good Friday, Pierantozzi hopes that four days will be long enough for any contaminant to clear out of the school.

Nationwide, the rash first turned up in Indiana in October, the CDC reports. About 18 third-graders and one teacher came down with it at a school of 390 students. The rash then appeared in November at the Marsteller Middle School in Manassas, Va. In a week's time, about 40 percent of the school's 940 students came down with the itchy skin condition, according to the Washington Post.

575 cases in Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, the rash started in an elementary school with 54 children in January. To date, 575 cases have been reported to the Pennsylvania Department of Health from 58 schools and child-care centers, the CDC reports.

On Feb. 4 in Oregon, an outbreak started with 53 elementary school children and 11 adults at one school. In that case, 84 percent of the cases were female. A second Oregon school had an outbreak beginning Feb. 21, in which 74 percent of the victims were girls. No other states reported such a large number of female victims.On Feb. 20, an elementary school in Connecticut had an outbreak, with about 25 students in a school of 253 infected.

All that health officials know so far is that this is a virus. The CDC reports there is no common cause or even proof that all the children are experiencing the same rash, though all the symptoms are similar.Many doctors have tested the children for a rash commonly known as fifth disease, a virus that is characterized by a mild rash and seems to affect children. Only a few of those tests have been positive for fifth disease, the CDC reported.The Wixon Middle School sent a note home to parents yesterday telling them the symptoms can be treated with a topical lotion, Aveeno soap and an antihistamine.
http://www.capecodonline.com/cctimes/mysteryrash28.htm

Symptoms

Red, itchy rash found on faces, arms, legs and bodies, swollen eyes and pink cheeks.
Duration: Most of the rashes went away in less than two weeks.

[Edited 1 times, lastly by Dan Rockwell on 03-31-2002]

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 03-31-2002 05:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Health officials puzzled by outbreak of rashes
Condition afflicts children in Md., other states; cause unknown
By A Sun Staff Writer
Originally published March 30, 2002
State health officials, investigating the outbreak of a mysterious rash, are sending questionnaires to the parents of Maryland children who recently have developed red, itchy bumps or blotches on their skin.

The condition, which usually disappears without treatment in a few hours or days, showed up in a handful of Talbot County elementary school children about three weeks ago. More recently, doctors have noted about 35 cases in Cecil County. Similar rashes have been reported in about 18 states. Doctors are at a loss to explain the outbreak.

The rashes don't appear to be caused by an infectious disease, and affected children exhibit no other symptoms. It's also uncertain whether the various outbreaks are related. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, diagnoses have included a range of conditions, including poison ivy, eczema and chemical exposure.

In Maryland, Dr. Ross Brechner, state epidemiologist, said the rash appears to be an allergy, similar to hives, that leaves red marks on the hands, elbows and face. Many of the children have been examined by doctors, who diagnosed nothing more than general dermatitis, Brechner said.

"We're concerned about this illness, but so far it's not something that people need to worry about," Brechner said. He said he hopes the questionnaires will yield data that can help scientists find common threads among the affected children. So far, CDC scientists reviewing medical data from around the country say they're turning up more differences than similarities.
http://sunspot.net/news/health/bal-md.rash30mar30.story?coll=bal%2Dhealth%2Dheadlines

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BOB B
Senior Member


LINDEN ,TEXAS,CASS
307 posts, Jan 2002

posted 04-02-2002 10:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for BOB B     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hate to say it, but i think it may be time we called our children in and required them to remain in the realtive safety of a hepa-filtered enviroment,at least until we can stop thier bullshit...This is truely a nightmare.how come I'm not waking up....someone wake me up aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

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Lulu
ice behaving badly

right here
2553 posts, Dec 2000

posted 04-02-2002 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Lulu   Visit Lulu's Homepage!   Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hate to say it, but i think it may be time we called our children in and required them to remain in the realtive safety of a hepa-filtered enviroment

No way Bob...I'm enjoying life to the fullest, so is my son. Outdoors everyday and loving it...regardless of the weather...or lack of it.

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KrissaTMC2
Never Surrender!


Greenwich, CT, USA
472 posts, Feb 2002

posted 04-02-2002 08:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KrissaTMC2     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Both Dan and I spend a lot of time outside here , especially when we're getting sprayed, and neither of us have come down with the rash yet and neither have any of the school children here. I don't know about Dan, but I'd die if I spent all my time indoors breathing filtered air. I'm going to enjoy whatever time I have left outside documenting everything.

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Dan Rockwell
Hoka hey! - heyokas!


Stamford, CT, USA
1750 posts, Dec 2001

posted 04-03-2002 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Dan Rockwell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I might not have the rash Krissa, but my sinuses are sure all screwed up and members of my team have suddenly found it necessary to carry bottles of water around with them to keep from getting dehydrated.

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